ADHD and ADD

Adult ADHD: 5 More Tips for Managing Technology

Psychotherapist and ADHD coach Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, believes that technology is a double-edged sword for adults with ADHD. It helps you be efficient. But it also distracts you from your work. Because before you know it, you’ve spent one hour surfing the web for something you can’t even remember. Or you find yourself sending just one more text when an important project requires your attention. And, inevitably, just one more leads to 20.

“Technology is like a drug, providing that dopamine hit after dopamine hit. It’s really stimulating," said Eric Tivers, LCSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach who leads the
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Happiness

Video: Materialism and Happiness

Apple's iPhone 7 is coming out this year, and it's going to be the greatest iPhone yet. Maybe the greatest smartphone yet. It's going to complete your life.
At least until the iPhone 8 comes out. That's really going to be the greatest iPhone yet.
Buying stuff is fun because the coolest phone or shirt or toaster or whatever always seems to be the one we don't have. Once I buy this snazzy new gadget or item of clothing or household appliance, then I'll be happy!
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Brain and Behavior

Does Posting Selfies Make You a Narcissist?

I've previously written how posting selfies is not a disorder (no, sorry, selfitis doesn't exist). Others have even suggested that posting selfies is simple a sign of healthy self-expression.

But last year, a few studies were published that linked taking selfies and posting them to a social network like Facebook to certain narcissistic traits. And this led some to believe that if you post a lot of selfies, you must be a narcissist.

However, the answer to the question of why people post selfies -- what motivates us to post selfies? -- is more complicated and nuanced -- as it usually is.

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ADHD and ADD

Adult ADHD: 5 Tips for Managing Technology So It Doesn’t Manage You

Technology for ADHD can be both a blessing and a curse. On the one hand, it helps adults with ADHD stay productive. After all, you can use technology to remind yourself of important appointments, meetings and deadlines. You can use technology to keep track of your tasks and help you structure your day.

On the other hand, technology can be incredibly distracting. ADHD coach and therapist Eric Tivers, LCSW, finds it to be a big challenge for his clients, who often don’t realize that it’s actually making things harder for them. They don’t “realize that every time they shift their attention, they’re killing their productivity and depleting finite resources of
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Brain and Behavior

Psychology Around the Net: July 16, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I must say, I hope you've all had a better week than I. During a quick getaway last weekend, I managed to catch a nasty summer cold (isn't getting sick during the summer the worst?) and, suffice it to say, I've spent a lot of time couch surfing with a box of tissues and all manner of cold medicine that doesn't. work. at. all.

Cue sneezing fit.

Still, I managed to scour the interwebs for some of the latest in mental health news just for you! Read on to find out the psychological benefits of writing, why time seems to go faster as we age, and -- oh yeah -- why the new all-the-rage app Pokemon Go is actually good for your mental health!

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General

Navigating the Tricky and Often Triggering World of Social Media as a Mom

For many moms, social media can be a triggering space. It can be a breeding ground for comparison, which so many moms are already prone to in their offline lives. Comparison only creates more and more doubt about everything from your parenting choices to how you are as a person.

Maybe you compare yourself to the mom on social media who makes creative meals, has a spotless home and entertains her kids with fun activities and adventures. Maybe you compare yourself to the mom who gushes about every part of parenting, while you’re crying and covered in throw-up. Maybe you compare yourself to the mom who’s back to her normal routine only days after giving birth, while you’re lying in bed in excruciating pain from your C-section.
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Anxiety and Panic

Pokemon Go Reportedly Helping People’s Mental Health, Depression

Pokémon Go is a new mobile game app that is based on the popular Pokémon game that was created in 1995. It uses a person's smartphone camera and GPS to place Pokémon characters in the real world in proximity to the player. In order to earn points, these characters need to be "caught" by the player. Players can see the characters in their real world surroundings by looking at their screen, and use the game to capture the Pokémon character.

Although not even out for a full week, many players have already taken to Twitter and other social media to share how Pokémon Go has helped their mental health, mood, social anxiety, and depression.

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Bipolar

Rating Mental Health Apps: Does Self-Monitoring Even Help?

With more than 165,000 health apps available -- most of them monitoring stuff related to your health in some manner -- you might assume there's a ton of research demonstrating the effectiveness of such self-monitoring. But you'd be wrong.

In the world of mental health apps, there's virtually no research demonstrating that monitoring your moods will benefit your treatment outcomes.

So why do so many companies and developers offer apps that simply spit back the data you put into them? Is there a rating organization that can help you make sense of all the mental health apps available?

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Children and Teens

Fear of Missing Out Affecting Your Family? 7 Tips to Help

FOMO, or fear of missing out, is a trendy term today. Which might lead us to dismiss or minimize its influence. But for many families, FOMO is a real problem that impedes their connection.

According to psychotherapist Rebecca Ziff, LCSW, FOMO depletes the quality of family time. She’s worked with kids and teens who aren’t able to enjoy downtime with their families because they worry they’re missing out on social functions with their friends. Which means they aren’t fully engaged or present with their families. Understandably, this leaves parents “feeling undervalued and ignored.”
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: June 25, 2016


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

Whew, I've had a stressful week. I've been juggling everything from major work deadlines to doctor appointments to preparing our guestroom for entertaining company all weekend, and honestly, the only thing that's helped keep me focused is my to-do list.

That's right. I am a huge advocate of to-do lists. I know some people avoid them, but, not I. I can't even explain the sheer elation I feel each time I mark off a...
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Children and Teens

What Do You See in the Mirror?

In 1973, an inquisitive psychologist named Beulah Amsterdam wanted to know whether babies recognized themselves in the mirror. To explore this riddle, he used the rouge test, which you likely studied in Psychology 101. Step one: put rouge on baby’s nose. Two: place teeny clown before mirror. Three: observe.

Babies aged 6 to 12 months typically thought, “Woot! Another baby. Let’s play.” Infants in their second year of life often acted wary of the “imposter” before looking away. Toddlers aged 24 months often recognized themselves, prompting some to wipe off the rouge. (Others were arguably too busy mulling over riddles, such as, “Where’s my milk carton?”)

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