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On Living Simply and with Integrity

In her young twenties, writer and activist Eileen Flanagan spent two years teaching English in the country of Botswana, which borders South Africa and Zimbabwe. She ate, lived, and slept in a 180 square-foot mud hut and was quite content.

Then life got a tad more complicated… she married, had kids, and eventually found herself in a three-story house packed full of stuff: Barbie condos, Heelys (sneakers with wheels), Wii games, electronic guitars, and microscopes.

In her engaging new book,
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Anxiety and Panic

How Bad Is Your FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)?

Have you ever wondered how bad your fear of missing out (FOMO) really is?

As a reminder, the fear of missing out is the psychological phenomenon where a person has extreme anxiety whenever they're doing something -- watching TV or a movie, eating dinner out, hanging out with friends -- that there may be something better they're not doing. It was brought on by the always-on access to social networks like Facebook, where a person is encouraged to constantly update their status.

And update we do! Our "news feeds" on Facebook and other social networks are full of what others in our life are doing. So is it any surprise that all of that apparent activity is causing some of us to be stressed out and anxious?

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Best of the Web

21 Mental Health Doctors & Therapists You Should Be Following on Twitter

There are a lot of fascinating therapists, psychologists, counselors and psychiatrists online today -- a far cry from what things looked like 20 years ago when Psych Central was founded. So we thought we'd spend some quality time culling Twitter for some of the more interesting folks whose Twitter feed is full of good conversation and information.

Below, in no particular order, you'll find what we consider to be some of the best mental health doctors and therapists you should be following on Twitter. We at Psych Central are proud to provide lots of great content, but realize that we can’t be the only source of information on the vast internet. Some you may recognize and already follow, while others will be brand new to you.

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Use This Psychological Principle to Master Business Networking

As young professionals, we’re taught to network like our careers depend on it. Your professional network can open just about any door. All we have to do to capture that holy grail of networking is put ourselves out there, and then we’re golden.

We’re told to just "start networking," but in reality it’s never that simple. When you’re new to the professional networking scene, figuring out how exactly to create
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Can You Treat Depression with an App?

With the proliferation of health tracking apps, it's no surprise to see dozens being offered to help treat people with depressive symptoms. (No app has been FDA-approved or scientifically proven to actually treat depression.)

The New York Times asks four experts and researchers in this area whether you can treat depression with an app in their latest Room for Debate. It's an interesting discussion worth the read.

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Screentime Is NOT Making Kids Moody, Crazy & Lazy

I'm sure Dr. Victoria Dunckley means well with her recent screed entitled "Screentime is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy." She cites research studies to back up her points, and buried in the middle of the article is the common-sense disclaimer that "restricting electronics may not solve everything."

But what Dr. Dunckley misses is how electronics today are to teens what the telephone and TV was to a prior generation (and the radio was to a generation before). The studies she references don't purport to show a casual effect, simply a correlation between two things. Generalizing from such correlations is a mistake too many well-meaning physicians (and even researchers) make.

Screentime is not "making" kids moody, crazy and lazy. Here's why.

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Children and Teens

How Does Parents’ Technology Use Affect Children?

“When my mom and dad are on their phones they act like I don’t exist. It makes me sad. I call and call their names and sometimes they don’t even look up or act like they hear me.”

A child client of mine, 6 years old, told me this during our last session together. This child is sensitive, intuitive, and brilliant. I wondered if a child who was less vulnerable to feeling abandoned would react the same way if his or her parents were on their phones.

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Hookup Culture: Dating Apps Don’t Change Who You Are

Every week there’s a new article published about how dating apps, specifically Tinder, are “tearing society apart” and fueling a “Dating Apocalypse” in America. I haven't been single in a while, so I was obviously curious about what changed. The answer is nothing.

Hooking up is nothing new. The one-night-stand wasn't invented during my lifetime. It would be naive to think there was a time when it didn't exist. It's not a Millennial invention, it's a Pleistocene invention. But is it a Millennial problem?
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The Problem with Google’s Health Knowledge Graphs

Earlier this year, Google changed how it presented health search results. It added a new box to its search results it calls a "Knowledge Graph."

Apparently this new product came about because a Google product manager had a hard time finding information about a concussion, using -- you guessed it -- Google. Believing that health information is different than all other information people search for, Google decided to start becoming a health information publisher instead of a search engine.

And when you get into the publishing business, well, you better know what you're doing. Can a search engine company also offer vetted health information you can trust?

The answer is unclear.

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Say Cheese! 5 Testimonies that Show Selfies Could Be Healthy

Every click brings you closer to loving yourself.

To me, the second best moment of the 2014 Oscars, after Ellen passed out slices of pizza to rows of America's most beloved movie stars, was when she made a group of them clump together for a group selfie.

It doesn't matter -- young or old -- selfies have become an epidemic. A study from a project called Selfiecity, backed by the City University of New York, California Institute of Telecommunication and Information, shows that selfies are more popular with women under 40 and men over 40.
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