Bipolar

My Well-Kept Secret

I’ve been an adjunct writing teacher at a major university off and on for more than 25 years. I teach the freshman-level classes -- College English I and II.

In College English I, students learn how to organize a variety of essays around thesis statements. The reading for this class consists of essays from a nonfiction anthology. In College English II, the students learn how to incorporate outside sources into their own persuasive documents. The reading for this more advanced course consists of a number of full-length texts organized around a particular theme.

One year, the theme was banned books. Students read I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou; Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck; Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger; and The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison.

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ADHD and ADD

ADHD Isn’t a Disorder of Attention

Many people think of ADHD as a disorder of attention or lack thereof. This is the traditional view of ADHD. But ADHD is much more complex. It involves issues with executive functioning, a set of cognitive skills, which has far-reaching effects.

In his comprehensive and excellent book Mindful Parenting for ADHD: A Guide to Cultivating Calm, Reducing Stress & Helping Children Thrive, developmental behavioral pediatrician Mark Bertin, MD, likens ADHD to an iceberg.

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General

How to Take Work Home (The Healthy Way)


Let’s face it: The traditional 9-to-5 work lifestyle is long gone.

For many of us, it’s not unusual to stay at the office until 7 or 8, or to burn the midnight oil working on a freelance gig, startup idea, or extra project to get ahead at work.

Even if your company promotes a healthy work-life balance, your workload may get out-of-control at some point and you’ll simply need to bring work home in the evenings or over the weekend.

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Brain and Behavior

4 Steps to Stop Seeking Approval from Others

Humans share an innate drive to connect with others. We’re evolutionarily wired to crave inclusion. Eons ago, this was linked with our survival; in prehistoric times, rejection triggered fear. If someone became isolated or was ousted from the group, his or her life would be at risk.

Because the consequences of being rejected were so extreme, our brains and behavior adapted to avoid disapproval from others. In fact, research has shown that social rejection activates many of the same brain regions involved in physical pain, which helps explains why disapproval stings.
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Books

Use This Psychological Principle to Master Business Networking

As young professionals, we’re taught to network like our careers depend on it. Your professional network can open just about any door. All we have to do to capture that holy grail of networking is put ourselves out there, and then we’re golden.

We’re told to just "start networking," but in reality it’s never that simple. When you’re new to the professional networking scene, figuring out how exactly to create
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Children and Teens

How to Send Kids off to College without Getting Upset

Many parents are surprised how heartbreaking it is sending their child off to college for the first time. It's natural that parents feel a sense of loss. It usually takes some time to accept that their child is no longer a permanent member of their household. Many of them don't expect the challenges of the empty nest syndrome. Realizing that letting go is the next stage of parenthood can make it easier.

Here is some advice to help parents deal with the emotions evoked by sending their child off to college.

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General

AllPsych Blog: The Greatest Psychology Blog You’re Not Reading

We love pop psychology. It has grown in popularity in recent years, as people have become more interested in what we used to call "self-help" tools and resources to help their lives, but are now known as "life hacks." Put simply, this area of psychology offers tips for better understanding and helping you out in your life, informed by the latest psychological research. It's like science, but to help out in your life.

AllPsych is our partner in psychology resources for students. A few months ago, we started a psychology blog at AllPsych, catering to discussing psychology insights from research and topics of interest to students of psychology. Most of you aren't yet reading this great psychology blog, so here's your chance to start!

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ADHD and ADD

3 Surefire Strategies that Don’t Work for ADHD

If you have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it’s really frustrating when the strategies you’re trying aren’t working. You might assume that the problem is you. What’s wrong with me? How is it that I still can’t get this right?

However, the real issue often lies with the technique or approach – which you might unwittingly think is helpful and yet is anything but. That’s why we asked ADHD experts to share strategies that don’t work for ADHD (and what does). Below, you’ll find three ineffective strategies.
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Books

Teaching Your Child to Pay Attention Amid Digital Distractions

Technology has its pros and cons. A TV show or iPad app can help kids learn about everything from history to animals. However, too much time with electronic devices starts to hamper attention and steal time away from other important things.

In her latest book Parenting in the Age of Attention Snatchers: A Step-by-Step Guide to Balancing Your Child’s Use of Technology psychologist, researcher and attention expert Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D, shares a slew of helpful strategies. She shows parents how to help their kids sharpen “voluntary attention.” This kind of attention requires effort and helps us achieve our goals.

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Children and Teens

Why People Drop Out of College: A Freudian Approach

It’s no surprise to anyone that many people who start college do not end up completing it. The U.S. Department of Education claims that “as of 2012, only 59 percent of students on average received a bachelor's degree within a six-year period. The numbers are much higher for private non-profit and public schools, but private for-profit schools are bringing up the rear with a staggering 32 percent finishing rate”(National Center for Educational Statistics).
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Anxiety and Panic

The Psychological Effects of Too Much Testing



How do I recall my years in elementary school? I surely remember assignments and standardized tests, but I can also conjure up images of snacks and story time and recreation with my peers in order to forge social relationships (which, in my opinion, is integral for development).

However, the light appears rather dim for today’s schoolchildren. The current academic curriculum is intensive. Lots of work, little play and tests galore.

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