Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: November 15, 2014

Job interviews, speech anxiety, and seasonal depression -- oh, my!

This week's Psychology Around the Net covers each of these topics and more.


The Psychology of the Job Interview: Take these psychology tips, tricks, and techniques into consideration the next time you interview for a new position.

A Quick Cure for Speech Anxiety?: HINT: Not one of these tips involves imagining people in their underwear.

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Children and Teens

How Mindful Analogies Can Help Kids in Therapy

School-aged children (6 to 11 years) often wonder why they are sitting in your office for therapy. Many thoughts and emotions are associated with coming to a mental health provider’s office, including curiosity, anxiety and even fear. In order to help kids deal with whatever may be bringing them to therapy, it’s important that they understand why they may need such a service.

Kids are most receptive to messages that are age-appropriate and stated in ways that they can make sense of and understand. For elementary school-aged children, a mindful analogy is often an excellent tool to employ. Analogies help children make sense of concepts that often aren’t easily explained.

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Anxiety and Panic

The Benefits of Being Scared

Being scared isn't always a negative. You can be scared in many different ways.

There is the “scary movie" kind of scared, where you don’t know what’s going to pop out on the screen. There's the jumping out of a plane kind of scared, where you fear real death and your adrenaline is pumping loudly. Lastly, there is the taking a chance kind of scared, where you have to address someone or something that’s anxiety-producing and you don't know if the outcome will be favorable.
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Psychology Around the Net: September 20, 2014

Blood tests for depression, happiness in the workplace, and tricking your brain to be more productive -- it's all in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

Study Diagnoses Med Test Anxiety: Tend to "freak out" when it's time to take a test? This recent Yale study suggests a possible treatment for what's known as "test anxiety."

Key Brain Connection Slow to Develop In Kids With ADHD: Recent studies show that, in children with ADHD, the growth and connections within and between key brain networks lags behind those of children of the same age without ADHD.

How to Let Go of Guilt and Regret and Forgive Yourself: Try these five ways to forgive yourself, despite the guilt and regret you might initially be feeling.

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9 Tips for Getting Kids with ADHD Organized for School

When it comes to school, we expect all kids to be organized. But we don’t realize just how complicated this really is, according to Elaine Taylor-Klaus, an educator and parenting coach. For kids with ADHD, getting organized is a big challenge.

In fact, ADHD affects the very skills that are required for success in school. Kids with ADHD have difficulty getting started, prioritizing, planning, managing their time and emotions, staying on task and focusing, she said. It’s the nature of the disorder, which impairs the executive functions of the brain.

Plus, each school year typically requires new systems, new habits, new books and new lockers, said Laurie Dupar, a trained psychiatric nurse practitioner and ADHD coach.

It’s important for parents, kids and teachers to realize just how difficult school-related tasks are for kids with ADHD. Fortunately, there are many strategies that help. Here are nine insights and techniques to try.

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‘I Don’t Want My Friends to Think I’m Crazy’: The Stigma of Bipolar on the College Campus

Mental illness is a prevalent issue on college campuses that often goes unseen and unacknowledged. When I decided I wanted to write an article about students at my university with bipolar disorder, I ran into the difficulty of finding subjects to interview. I asked around my fellow students to see if anyone knew someone who might be willing to speak to me.

“My friend is dating this one crazy girl,” one of my friends jokingly told me. “She’s so bipolar. You should try interviewing her.”
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Children and Teens

3 Tips for Sparking Your Kids’ Creativity

“Creativity is a gift, given in some measure to all of us,” said Tom Sturges, an accomplished music executive, author, teacher and speaker. For over 15 years, Sturges has mentored and taught thousands of students to explore their creativity, “to let their creative instinct 'emerge' rather than to force it out into the open.”

(There’s even a documentary, “Witness to a Dream,” about his work with inner-city kids in Los Angeles.)

Creativity, he noted, isn’t drawing, painting or writing a song. “These are just some uses of the creative instinct. But there are so many ways that children can be creative.”
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The Power of Curiosity: 3 Strategies for Staying Curious

As kids we’re insatiably inquisitive. Everything -- from cups to cupboards to dirt to our own hands -- fascinates us. But for many of us, as we start getting older, we lose our appetite for curiosity.

And yet curiosity is powerful. It adds color, vibrancy, passion and pleasure to our lives. It helps us solve stubborn problems. It helps us do better in school and work. And even more so, it is our birthright, as Ian Leslie writes in his book Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends on It.
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Children and Teens

5 Ways for Parents to Motivate Their Kids for Back-to-School Time

As the summer winds down and stores bring out their back-to-school supplies, parents and children start to feel different emotions about the new school year.

Students may feel anxiety about a new school or a new teacher. They may not want to think about homework, tests and the pressures of school. Parents, however, may be dreaming of having their students back on a schedule.

If your child is feeling apprehensive about the upcoming school year, there are many ways you can get them excited.

Here are five fun ways:

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