Students Articles

8 Reasons Why Kindness Should Be Taught in Schools

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

8 Reasons Why Kindness Should be Taught in SchoolsMost people have heard the phrase “random acts of kindness,” which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in another’s happiness. Terms like this are increasing in popularity around the world, as more people identify a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism.

It seems we just can’t get enough of those addictive, feel-good emotions, and with good reason.

Scientific studies have shown that kindness has a great number of physical and emotional benefits and that children require a healthy dose of warm fuzzies in order to flourish as healthy, happy, well-rounded individuals.

Is Taking Adderall to Boost College Brain Performance Cheating?

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

Is Taking Adderall to Boost College Brain Performance Cheating?A new study that will be presented tomorrow finds that 33 percent of students surveyed for a study at an Ivy League college said they did not think taking an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug, like Adderall or Ritalin, is a form of cheating. Another 25 percent weren’t sure if it was cheating or not, and 41 percent thought it was.

It’s almost as if these college kids need to crack open a dictionary once in a while. Cheating is “to act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage, especially in a game or examination.”

If you’re not taking an ADHD drug for ADHD but rather for its brain-boosting effects, guess what? — that’s cheating.

Tips for Transitioning Graduates Into the Real World

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

graduation2010

As the end of the school year approaches, expectations and anxiety begin to loom in equal measure. Prior to graduation, the notion that “now life really begins” fills people with giddy anticipation.

However, there are several unexpected challenges that can take the young graduate by surprise, dismaying their parents who have been anxiously waiting for their offspring to spring into action on their own two feet.

If you know about the looming pitfalls in advance, you can expect the unexpected and plan ahead, lessening the impact on the student’s relationship with his or herself and the relationship between parent and “child.”

Scapegoating ADHD — Because It’s Popular

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Scapegoating ADHD -- Because It's Popular

As if people with a mental illness didn’t have enough to worry about.

One of the favorite media topics to write about is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a potentially serious mental illness that affects millions of Americans. It causes them to not be able to focus on everyday tasks that most of us have little trouble with. Many people with ADHD can’t sit still, interrupt others, and can’t wait their turn. Others find any kind of task that requires sustained attention simply impossible.

In the modern world, with so many devices and services competing for our attention, ADHD is at the heart of a perfect storm for those afflicted. While most of us juggle our attempts at multi-tasking seemingly well, those with untreated ADHD have a hard time just getting started.

So it makes me wonder: why are so many journalists quick to pick on ADHD?

Does Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) Exist?

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Does Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) Exist?Sluggish cognitive tempo is a long-time component believed to either be a part of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or may be its own stand-alone concern.

Parts of what we now call sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) has been around since the 1960s, but it was in the late 1980s — long before any attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications existed — when researchers first demonstrated that SCT symptoms are probably a unique condition or sub-type of ADHD (Lahey et al., 1988; Neeper & Lahey, 1986).

In other words, the scientific foundation for sluggish cognitive tempo has been around for nearly 30 years. It’s not new. And it’s hardly news. Scientists regularly identify dozens of proposed syndromes or symptom constellations in their research. Only a tiny minority of them ever go on to become a recognized mental disorder or diagnosis.

But does SCT really exist? Is it its own condition or disorder?

Fidgeting Strategies that Help People with ADHD Focus

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

Fidgeting Strategies that Help People with ADHD FocusWe’re taught that we need to sit still and focus on one thing when we’re studying, writing, working or engaging in other activities.

But for people with ADHD those things usually don’t work. They’re especially ineffective when they need to focus on tedious or mundane tasks. People with ADHD often work best when they’re doing something else, too.

Why No One is Talking About the Possible Overdiagnosis of Autism

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Why No One is Talking About the Possible Overdiagnosis of AutismWith the latest CDC figures out, it appears autism is now appearing in about 1 in 68 children in the United States. The disorder — now officially known as autism spectrum disorder — is being diagnosed at a rate that represents a 30 percent increase from 1 in 88 two years ago.

What’s amazing to me is that I couldn’t find a single media report that floated the idea that this increase represents an overdiagnosis of the disorder. While “overdiagnosis” seems to be the first thing suggested when the topic is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder’s (ADHD) huge jump in diagnoses over the past two decades, it’s not mentioned in any description of autism’s increase.

Why the double-standard?

Suicidal Ideation & Cyberbullying

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

Suicidal Ideation and CyberbullyingBullying probably is as old as mankind. However, being a longstanding part of human behavior does not make it acceptable.

Studies have shown many problems associated with being a victim of bullying, including delayed growth and development; mental health problems; medical issues; poor academic performance; and more. Many of the problems caused by bullying can last into adulthood.

It is estimated that between 5 and 20 percent of children worldwide are victims of physical, verbal and exclusionary bullying. Suicide also is a significant problem, with almost 20 percent of adolescents in America having suicidal thoughts and five to eight percent attempting it.

Facing Down a Quarter-Life Crisis

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

Facing Down a Quarter-Life CrisisCollege graduation day: You’ve made it! It’s a priceless feeling that you will never forget.

That diploma is still radiating through your fingers, as though it is some sort of golden passport. Before you even look down, to check to see if your name is spelled correctly, you have already booked your flight to the future and are well on your way. You hear the comforting voice of your flight attendant say “We will be taking off momentarily, please stow away any and all college books, research articles, writing assignments, forget about group projects, studying for exams and forget about rushing around campus to make it to class on time. Just sit back, relax and enjoy the flight, we will take care of the rest.”

You are now a college graduate. Congratulations! All of your hard work has paid off.

Parents: Helping Your Child with ADHD

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Parents: Helping Your Child with ADHDSome hype in the media has been made about an “over-diagnosis” of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But parents with children who actually have ADHD are left scratching their heads — why are some people demonizing their child’s disorder? Would a journalist go after pediatric cancer with the same gusto?

I don’t have the answer to those kinds of questions, but I do have some tips to share with parents of children with ADHD. Raising a child with ADHD presents unique opportunities and challenges. But it’s the challenges that can sometimes throw parents for a loop.

Why Social Networks Like Facebook Fail

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Why Social Networks Like Facebook FailAll online social networks eventually fail. Before Facebook, there was Friendster and Myspace — leaders of the social networking space in 2004 (just 10 years ago). Now they are relegated to historical footnotes, or the butt of some joke.

Facebook, too, will fail, even if it doesn’t look like it today. And that’s not due to any specific failing of Facebook, but rather of human nature and the psychology of online identity management.

Here’s why all social networks inevitably fail.

Millennials’ Problem? Depression & Few Skills in Conflict Negotiation

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Millennials' Problem? Depression & Few Skills in Conflict NegotiationI’ll start off by saying I don’t think it’s fair to any generation to claim you know what’s ailing them. I think a generation of people is so large and diverse, it’s hard to make generalizations that will apply to anything larger than a subgroup.

But that doesn’t stop both journalists and others from speculating about “what’s wrong with Millennials.”

For good reason — rates of depression are on the rise amongst older teens and young adults, hitting levels we’ve never seen before. Recent studies put the rate of depression as high as 44 percent among college students. Suicide remains a leading cause of death in this age group.

So is depression the problem? Helicopter parenting? Something else? Let’s find out.

Recent Comments
  • Passion13: I feel your pain. I would love to communicate with you privately. Would you have an email address that you...
  • Passion13: I need some help and advice!! I know my husband suffers from depression, he might even be bipolar. We have...
  • Mindy: Go find some one else- get a divorce. You do not need to live like this!!
  • Gary: Divorce him now!!!
  • Gary: Mindy is absolutely right in her assessment!
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code