Stress Articles

How to Make the Most of Therapy for Your Child

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

How to Make the Most of Therapy for Your ChildTherapy isn’t just helpful for adults. It’s important for kids, too. Therapy provides kids with “a ‘safe’ place to process and explore their world without the inhibitions that the world places on them,” said Clair Mellenthin, LCSW, a child and family therapist.

Therapy can help kids with everything from nightmares to social anxiety to difficulty concentrating in school to trauma to mental health issues, she said.

In therapy kids are able to work on these issues without worrying that they’re hurting their parents’ feelings or disappointing them, she said.

Psychology Around the Net: January 10, 2015

Saturday, January 10th, 2015

Healing My Inner Child

Happy Saturday, readers!

As cliche as it might sound, we can’t help but think of new beginnings when we think of a new year, and what better way to welcome new beginnings than by keeping up with all the new mental health news, research, and even opinions as we launch into 2015?

After all, we want to stay as healthy and informed as possible!

This week’s Psychology Around the Net features research related to pets and their owners’ personalities, gut bacteria and how it relates to anxiety, how childhood guilt can affect adult mental health issues, and more.

9 Ideas for Creating Serene and Satisfying Days

Friday, January 9th, 2015

9 Ideas for Creating Serene and Satisfying DaysOur circumstances don’t necessarily have to change in order for us to experience serenity and satisfaction. Because sometimes we can’t change a situation. Most things are not within our control.

This is a hard realization but tends to feel liberating when you can accept it. And it certainly takes practice to keep accepting it. But we can always look within ourselves. We can change our beliefs, thoughts and actions.*

In her book The Wholehearted Life: Big Changes and Greater Happiness Week by Week author Susyn Reeve shares a slew of exercises for contentment and community. Below are nine ideas and activities to help you cultivate calm, kindness and connection throughout your days.

4 Simple But Significant Ways to Start the Day with Self-Compassion

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

I'm Not Psychic: The Cold, Hard Truth about CatastrophizingSelf-compassion provides a bounty of benefits. It helps us create more meaningful relationships — with ourselves and with others.

According to psychotherapist Lea Seigen Shinraku, MFT, practicing self-compassion helps us tolerate difficult feelings instead of turning to distractions — such as a credit card or remote control — and becoming dependent on them, she said.

“This pattern can be painful, because it traps you in a never-ending quest to avoid discomfort.”

Self-compassion teaches us that we don’t have to turn away from discomfort. “In fact, feeling the emotions that are present allows them to flow, while avoiding them tends to keep them stuck.”

The Power in Being Still & How to Practice Stillness

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

3 Ways to Develop A Spiritual PracticeToday, stillness can be hard to come by. There’s just so much going on. So much noise both inside and outside our brains. So many tasks on our to-do lists. At least several screens within reach.

But stillness is still possible. It, too, is within our reach whenever we need it.

You can cultivate stillness while walking on a busy street, while chaos swirls all around you.

5 Signs Stress Is Destroying Your Love Life and How to Save It

Monday, January 5th, 2015

Portrait of an upset couple

Stressed out? You may be damaging your relationship more than you think. Here’s how to fix it.

Stress is sensory overload. Love, at its best, is sensory openness.

Our senses — touch, smell, taste, seeing, hearing, and intuition — are how we experience ourselves and others. Under stress, we lose access to our senses, and therefore, lose our ability to connect intimately, and our partners may give up in frustration.

Coming to Terms with Your Delusions

Monday, January 5th, 2015

Coming to Terms With Your DelusionsI’d be lying if I said I haven’t thought some pretty outrageous things in the course of my illness. I’d also be lying if I said I don’t think about outrageous things still. Even with a good amount of stability, delusions can still persist.

Sometimes it’s about what people think of you, maybe just an offhand notion. Other times it can be so bad that you think you’re a king or a prophet or Jesus Christ himself. I’ve seen every part of the spectrum.

Nine years on, I still deal with whether people are making fun of me. This is a delusion which, no matter what I’ve tried, I can’t stop.

Adults and ADHD: Reminders for When You’re Feeling Overwhelmed

Monday, January 5th, 2015

Adults And ADHD: Reminders for When You’re Feeling OverwhelmedClinical psychologist Roberto Olivardia’s clients who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) regularly tell him they feel overwhelmed by everyday tasks. “They feel as if they are in the midst of an avalanche of chores they cannot properly prioritize, organize or execute.”

Tasks such as paying the bills, preparing dinner, or getting the car fixed can feel monumental, he said. On top of that, adults with ADHD can feel frustrated seeing others without ADHD accomplish these tasks with little effort, he added. “This leads many with ADHD to feel like they are ‘failing at life.'”

How to Put the Brakes On

Monday, December 29th, 2014

7 Ways to Navigate Self-DoubtA lot of people run through their lives going from one task to another without taking time to stop and smell the roses.

Our society is overworked, and as result, overstressed.

I know what it’s like to get so overwhelmed on something that you slowly start to lose your grip on reality. That’s just one of the many things I have to deal with while living with schizophrenia.

The point is, it’s important to put the brakes on when you start to feel overwhelmed. This is just as important for regular people as it is for people with a major mental illness. However, these two types of people don’t react to stress the same way.

The Power of Maybe

Friday, December 26th, 2014

The Power of MaybeMany of us view uncertainty as the enemy. It makes us uncomfortable and fearful — especially if our expectations have painted only one picture. That is, we dread uncertainty when we’ve convinced ourselves that only one result will do. Only one thing will make us happy or feel fulfilled. Only one thing, one path will lead to our dream life.

This one thing may be a relationship, a home, a business venture, a big move. Or, as in Allison Carmen’s case, a specific law school.

You Might be Codependent If…

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

You Might be Codependent If...While there are many features of codependency, here are some top ones. See if these apply to you.

1. You are preoccupied with others’ feelings. A friend to whom I was talking years ago about my worries of having upset someone asked if I felt responsible for others’ feelings. I immediately thought to myself, “Well, yeah. I mean, aren’t I?”

Looking back now, I understand what my friend was getting at. His idea was that we each are responsible for our own thoughts, feelings or actions.

Could Your iPad, Laptop or Kindle Be Keeping You From Sleep?

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Could Your iPad, Laptop or Kindle Be Keeping You From Sleep?

Getting a good night’s sleep is a challenge for many people. Whether it’s constant awakenings throughout the night or difficulty falling asleep or something else, your sleep is the foundation for your mental health. Without regular, deep sleep, you’re not functioning at your best. For most of us, that’s a problem.

We’ve previously reported on research that shows light in your bedroom can interrupt your sleep cycle. Turning off those LEDs and turning down those bright clocks can even help too (something a lot of people miss). And there may be tools to help you improve your sleep even if you use electronic devices at night.

But what about using our iPads, tablets, smartphones, laptops or Kindles before we go to bed?

Preliminary new research suggests you should look at all of your electronic devices just as you’d eye a cup of full-strength coffee an hour before bed — with extreme caution.

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