Slow Eating Challenge Articles

Why Do We Overeat?

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Why Do We Overeat?Is it what we eat? How we eat? How we learned to eat?

Many Americans are asking these questions and searching for the answers as they battle thickening waistlines and pounds that just don’t seem to come off.  And many watch in alarm as our children struggle with the same issues of obesity as American adults.

In recent posts, I have discussed how the media has focused attention heavily on what we eat.

And certainly the food that we put into our bodies plays a significant role in how much we weigh. 

5 Cognitive Behavioral Strategies for Losing Weight that Work

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

5 Cognitive Behavioral Strategies for Losing Weight that WorkWhen we think of weight loss, we often think about what we eat. The questions we ask ourselves tend to revolve around how much fat, protein and carbs to eat, or whether beets help take off the pounds. 

Diets touted in the media as optimal for weight loss abound, yet we remain a nation with an obesity problem.

What we tend to ignore, when we think of weight loss, is how we are approaching and managing the process of change. As important as it is to focus on what you eat to lose weight and keep it off, it is equally crucial to consider physical activity and maintaining lifestyle changes over time.

How to make behavioral changes, what strategies we use to adhere to new ways of eating and increasing physical activity cannot be ignored.

PsychCentral’s Slow Eating Challenge: Are You Ready To Enjoy Food Again?

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Psych Centrals Slow Eating ChallengeEating slowly is not my specialty — and I don’t think I’m alone.

It’s hard to tell where the habit to rapidly shovel food toward my mouth came from, but I think it may have something to do with 12 years of 20-minute school lunches. Twenty minutes to find a place to sit, buy food, talk with friends and eat a turkey sandwich was hardly enough time, and you couldn’t even take food to your next class (unless you were sneaky…something I’m pleading the fifth on). Those quickfire childhood lunches combined with five years of a career where I routinely eat at my desk have created a monster: sometimes I’m not even tasting my food as I eat it.

Mindful Eating is quite the buzz phrase here on PsychCentral, with many of our wonderful bloggers advocating for a new way to see and experience food. The benefits of mindful eating include: actually tasting what’s in your mouth, easier digestion, lowered consumption and a better relationship with food in general. When we take time to chew slowly and experience our meal without the interruption of television, work or even, at times, conversation, we are able to connect with our bodies on a much more intimate level.

Recent Comments
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  • leon: I hear you there, I have been in a relationship for 25 years yet feel I am single. In order of importance to my...
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