General

Why Psychologists are Starting to Care About Sleep Apnea

Sleep has always been an integral part of mental health, but now there is more reason than ever to consider an interrelation between the two. Recent studies, such as the one cited in a previous Psych Central article, have confirmed a strong correlation between depression and the prevalent disorder of sleep apnea. There are also connections between sleep apnea and other aspects of mental health, as well as reasons why the psychology field should familiarize itself with the symptoms of this disorder.

Though commonly mistaken for mere snoring, sleep apnea is a serious medical condition characterized by brief pauses in breath during sleep. The cessation of breathing prevents the sleeper from inhaling oxygen and can lead to a multitude of health complications that range from insomnia and high blood pressure to tumor growth and a higher cancer risk. Moreover, sleep apnea is not a rarity. In America alone, over 14 million people suffer from sleep apnea but do not know it.

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: May 30, 2015


This week's Psychology Around the Net will teach you about the connection between personal scents and happiness, how brain stimulation techniques might treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, the similar effects between oxytocin and alcohol, and more.

Do People Transmit Happiness by Smell? Using scent samples, new research shows you could pick up on others' positive emotions through their sweat.

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Life Lessons from the Roach Motel

Even from the airport taxi, I could tell that the motel's website had been more Photoshop than reality. From my after-work evening flight, I had just landed in Florida for a professional conference where I was to chair a discussion panel. Always eager to score a bargain, I had selected and booked this budget motel over the official five-star conference location.

A friend helped me find and unlock my room, and before she left -- of course, she had booked the five-star conference hotel -- she said, "I’ll leave my cell phone on all night. Call me immediately if you …"

Continue Reading

Brain and Behavior

Six Ways to Do Less and Get More Done

Chances are you have a to-do list that stretches longer than a roll of toilet paper. But if you want to get more done and feel better while doing it, try these tips:

1. Get a good night’s sleep.

This is a biggie. Sleep is essential to our productivity and health. Still, many of us tend to push beyond the point of exhaustion to get it all done. This not only leads to late bedtimes, but also more mistakes, a loss of focus, burnout, accidents, illness, and other things that thwart our productivity.
Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: April 11, 2015


Learn more about changing mental health-related terms, the psychological factors that might lead to overeating, a new Medicaid and mental health law proposed by the Obama Administration, and more in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

Can We Replace Misleading Terms Like 'Mental Illness,' 'Patient,' and 'Schizophrenia': Find out why one Duke University professor feels these and other related terms can both "provide clarity" and "badly mislead."

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: April 4, 2015


This week's Psychology Around the Net covers pilots and psychiatric evaluations, the effects of multitasking on your brain, the science-based claim that money can buy happiness (say what?!) and more.

Inside a Pilot's Mind: After Germanwings Plane Crash, Pondering Pilot Psychology: One former pilot's op-ed on "ordinary varieties of human behavior, psychiatric evaluations during pilots' careers, and handling emergencies -- including the risk they might cause an emergency themselves.

Continue Reading

Brain and Behavior

The Secret to Remembering More

I was going to write this post weeks ago when I first read the story about triggering memory.

But I forgot.

I also forgot where I put the notes, and the research. But, I did remember the number for the Chinese takeout and to invoice early as per my client’s request.

What’s that about? Why do some of these must-do details stick in our memories, while others -- which we had contemplated just moments before -- don’t?
Continue Reading

Addiction

Psychology Around the Net: March 14, 2015


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

Despite losing an extra hour this week, we hope you'll make some time for today's Psychology Around the Net, which takes a look at how daylight-saving time can affect your relationships, what teen depression really looks like, how your psychologist feels about dating apps, and more.

Daylight-Saving Time Is Bad for Your Relationships: We already know that poor sleep leads to a wealth of mental and physical health problems, but losing that extra hour during daylight-saving time (or any time) could lead to relationship problems, too.

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

4 Stress-Busting Steps for a More Restful Night


Do you tend to ruminate on the negative events of your past or the fears of tomorrow? Many of us do. When we allow this pattern to continue, however, daily stresses and traumas have a way of building themselves up in our psyches, and even in our bodies, causing chronic mental and physical tension. This can make getting to sleep at night a very real challenge.

More than three in 10 adults in the U.S. suffer from brief symptoms of insomnia, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. One in 10 has a chronic insomnia disorder in which the sufferer has trouble sleeping at least three times a week for at least three months. Symptoms of anxiety and depression are often the driving forces of these sleepless nights which can eventually turn into a continual cycle of depression, no sleep, more depression, and so forth.

But why is it so hard to relax at night?

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: March 7, 2015


Get the latest on the psychological importance of dressing for success, how distractions might affect creativity, anxiety and poor decision-making, and more in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

An Early Bedtime Could Prevent Mental Illness, Study Finds: Canadian and French researchers propose that earlier bedtmies (and healthier meals) could relate to mental health in the "way that our body's natural cycles affect certain chemicals in the brain."

How to Get Your Relationship Back On Track After a Terrible Fight: No relationship is "perfect," and some might even say fighting (or at least arguing or disagreeing) is a healthy part of any relationship; however, what happens when the fight takes a toll on an otherwise happy, healthy relationship? Check these tips for getting the romance back on track.

Continue Reading

Anorexia

Psychology Around the Net: February 28, 2015


Check out this week's Psychology Around the Net to learn more about smokers and their relationships to anxiety and depression, how your state ranks regarding the five aspects of life satisfaction, neurons that predict how we might react in particular situations, and more.

Neurons That Help Predict What Another Individual Will Do Identified: Scientists have located two groups of neurons in primates that: one that activates during cooperation situations and another that predicts how one will react.

Continue Reading