General

How to be Productive without Losing Your Sanity or Skimping on Self-Care

In our quest to get things done, we might be missing something, or rather someone, very important: ourselves.

That is, in trying to get everything checked off our to-do lists, we might neglect our needs. We might sacrifice sleep. We might work overtime without much, if any, rest. We might feel the pressure to schedule every minute of our day, believing that we should be doing and going all the time.

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General

Getting Married Takes a Leap of Faith

Many singles are conflicted about marrying. They yearn for the fulfillment a good marriage brings but are afraid to commit. They fear it won’t work out, which, given the current high rate of marriage failures, is understandable.

It should come as no surprise that it takes a leap of faith to marry. The example below shows how one woman resolved her conflict about marrying. Her major challenges were learning to believe in herself and gaining trust that she could succeed.

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Anxiety and Panic

4 More Things that Create or Boost Your Anxiety

In many ways we create our own anxiety. It might be our habits or the actions we take. It might be our perspective on everything from traveling on airplanes to how life works. The good news is that we can do something about these triggers—instead of letting them generate needless anxiety, sink our mood and rule our lives.

Below, counseling psychologist Rosy Saenz-Sierzega, Ph.D, shared four potential triggers and how we can reduce or navigate them healthfully.

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General

Uncomfortable with Feeling Sadness? These Tips Might Help

When we’re upset, many of us do everything but cope with our sadness. We work. We shop. We eat. We drink. We clean. We run errands. We organize. We simply don’t stop moving. And we convince ourselves that we’re too busy to feel sad.

We just can’t pause when there are piles (and piles) of things to do. We try to avoid sadness at all costs. Maybe we’ve learned to see sadness as an emotion we definitely don't want to feel.
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Family

Want to Be Close to Someone? Ask These 36 Questions

Can you create a sense of closeness or intimacy with a complete stranger? Psychology research says, yes, you can.

Nearly 20 years ago, a team of psychology researchers led by Arthur Aron (1997) conducted an experiment that demonstrated that you can create a sense of closeness or intimacy with another person simply by asking and answering a set of 36 questions together.

But was the closeness produced in the experimental condition the same as the real closeness we feel with long-time partners and friends?

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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Parenting: Teaching Your Kids to Regulate Their Emotions

On the outside, when a child with ADHD is having an outburst, it might look like they’re misbehaving on purpose. They’re kicking, screaming, crying and throwing their toys. Or maybe it’s the opposite: They’ve completely shut down.

But there is nothing intentional about these behaviors. Kids don’t want to get angry or act out. “Their brains are actually wired to [over-react],” said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in ADHD.
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Marriage and Divorce

Can Practicing Mindfulness Lead to Unconditional Love?

Is it even possible to find unconditional love?

Unconditional love. A love that comes without any conditions, expectations, constraints, or parameters; a love that just IS. A love that is so perfect and so pure that it's given freely -- no matter what.

Does it exist? And if it does, is it possible to practice in the context of a relationship? Can we truly love someone unconditionally?

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Happiness

5 Ways Faking Confidence Leads to Authentic Happiness


Sometimes you have to work with what you've got!

Fake it 'til you make it -- We hear this advice all the time.

But, does the approach really work?

When you know what you’re doing and where you’re going, you carry yourself more assertively and, as a result, attract better opportunities.

And it seems, even when you don’t know what you're doing, when you ethically fake it by acting overconfident, you still achieve greater happiness.

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Friends

5 Ways Unhealthy Couples Use Facebook

Facebook is a wonderful social tool that keeps us connected with friends and family in our busy daily lives. But used in the wrong way, it can become a liability in both our lives and our relationships. Here are five ways that unhealthy couples use Facebook.

If you recognize yourself in one or more of these ways, you may want to re-evaluate your use of Facebook. Cutting back on using it may benefit not only your own feelings of self-esteem but also your romantic relationship.

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General

8 Small Ways to Show Your Spouse Some Love

Gretchen Rubin says, “What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while.” This is true for relationships. Love is in the small things. In daily acts.

“Consistency is king in relationships,” said Anna Osborn, LMFT, a licensed psychotherapist who practices in Sacramento, Calif., and virtually coaches couples across the country. So as great as grand gestures are, it’s the small acts that help our partners to feel seen and significant. Feeling valued is our biggest need in intimate relationships, Osborn said.
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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Natural Remedies for Rapid Relief of Anxiety

Excerpted and adapted from Anxiety: Top Tips For Rapid Relief Of Anxiety, Panic, Nervousness, and Worry by Lance Levan
Some forms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have proven to ease the stress of anxiety, based on research studies. Complementary medicine includes strategies that are not routinely used in Western medicine, although some doctors are favorable towards these methods.

Here are examples of several types of CAM that are used frequently to treat people with anxiety:

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Anxiety and Panic

5 More Ways to be Kind to Yourself When You’re Anxious

So many of us judge ourselves for being anxious. We think we’re weak. We think we’re being stupid or ridiculous. We think we shouldn’t feel this way -- and ironically, these thoughts only exacerbate our anxiety.

According to clinical psychologist Karin Lawson, PsyD, “When someone is judging themselves for having feelings, then it doesn't allow space to figure out how to soothe and move through the emotion.”

She shared this analogy: A person is experiencing physical pain in her arm. She purposely tenses up and tightens her arm muscles to power through it. But this just layers the pain and creates more discomfort.
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