Family

Learn to Love Yourself First

Most psychologists will agree that being loved and being able to love is crucial to our happiness. Sigmund Freud once said, “love and work ... work and love. That’s all there is.” But for many, the search for love causes a great deal of frustration and unhappiness. And what about self-love and its significance to our happiness?

Whether you’re single, happily in a relationship, or in an “it’s complicated” one, it’s our relationship with ourselves that sets the foundation for all our other interactions and is the secret to having fulfilling and healthy intimate relationships.
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Anxiety and Panic

This Simple Task Could Make You More Resilient

When we’re anxious our bodies undergo changes to prepare for a fight or flight situation. It’s an evolutionary reaction. Picture the moment a deer hears the snap of a twig nearby. The heart rate goes up, breathing becomes shallow, and the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol are released.

Some people recover physically and emotionally much more quickly after a stressful situation -- a trait known as resilience. It’s ideal that our bodies can return to normal shortly after an anxiety spike. After all, chronic stress hurts our bodies and our minds.

Becoming resilient in the face of stress could be as simple as paying attention to your own bodily responses, according to a
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Anxiety and Panic

5 Tips for Highly Sensitive People in Navigating Overwhelm

When you’re a highly sensitive person, you have a rich and complex inner life. And you tend to get overwhelmed -- more so than non-sensitive people. You might get overwhelmed by bright lights, loud noises, strong smells, coarse fabrics and big crowds. You might feel frazzled when someone is watching you work or there’s a lot to do in a short amount of time. And you might feel frazzled when there’s a lot going on around you.*

Highly sensitive people (HSPs) tend to get overwhelmed or over-stimulated because they “process more information from their environment and from within than others do,” said Jean Fitzpatrick, LP, a psychotherapist who specializes in working with HSPs.
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Anxiety and Panic

Networking for Introverts: 4 Secrets to Meet New People

Networking can be, at times, awkward and even produce anxiety. The thought of reaching out to people you don’t know to build potential business relationships can seem daunting. How do those “super connector” social butterflies carry themselves with such confidence while others stammer and stutter?

As it turns out, there’s a psychology to relationship building that will not only help you feel more secure when meeting new people, but will also transform your stack of business cards into meaningful connections that may advance your career.
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Books

A Great Way to Cultivate Gratitude

We know that being grateful is important. It boosts our energy and well-being. It helps us to cope with stress. Simply, it brightens our mood and helps us feel good. But sometimes we forget to give thanks. Sometimes, we give thanks only on certain days (such as holidays) and not on others (the days we’re exhausted, overwhelmed, burnt out). Sometimes, we count a few blessings to ourselves but quickly move on to something else.

In his book Gratitude Works! A 21-Day Program for Creating Emotional Prosperity author and psychology professor Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D, includes practices for cultivating, or growing, our gratitude. Because as he writes, “Through practice, giving thanks grows from the ground of one’s being. Grateful feelings, once buried, can surface if we take the time to notice and reflect… Gratitude is like fertilizer to the mind, spreading connections and improving its function in nearly every realm of experience.”
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Bipolar

How to Deal with Psychosis the Moment It Occurs

Psychosis is defined as being overwhelmed to the point of losing grip on reality. Sometimes this manifests itself as paranoia that people are going to kill you and sometimes it manifests itself as delusions that people are sending you secret messages through their body language or their words.

Essentially psychosis is when you start to fully believe that the things your brain is telling you are true and, for people with mental illness, psychosis is a big thing to worry about.

It goes without saying that a life of not being able to trust your own mind is not the greatest carnival ride in the world, but millions of people deal with it on a daily basis.
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General

8 Effective Ways to Keep Your Partner Interested

Being in a relationship involves time, commitment, patience, a willingness to forgive, an openness and vulnerability, and giving without expectation of anything in return. This sounds like a lot of work and it is, but the potential rewards are well worth the effort. Yet even as you work at your relationship, you also need to endeavor to keep it fresh. Here are eight tips for doing so:

Make an effort to be present.
You might think that being in the same room with your partner is enough to be present. But that doesn’t hold true in a society where it’s easier to text than communicate even when two people are in the same room. Everyone’s buried in their electronic devices. Put the devices on mute. Your physical presence is one way to keep your partner interested, but there’s more at stake than simply occupying space.

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Anger

3 Ways Fighting Can Actually Help Your Relationship

Have it out! It's good for you.

There's something wholesome and good to be said for couples that never ever fight with each other -- I just don't know what it is. That hasn't been my experience so I really can't say whether that makes any particular love affair better.

My guess is that couples who never argue or have it out are probably building up a good head of steam inside themselves. Human nature -- even for the most zen among us -- seems to dictate that we speak our minds rather than bite our lips. The world doesn't move forward on the backs of lip biters.
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: February 6, 2016


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

I hope your February is off to a great start -- I know mine is! Honestly, I don't know what to make of this winter so far -- one weekend I'm snowed in, and the next it's, well, almost spring out there!

Anyway, I've rounded up some interesting little psychology-related nuggets for you to feast on this weekend, whatever your plans, so sit back and get ready to learn about how a parent's depression...
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General

3 Myths about Healthy Marriages that Most People Think Are True

There are many myths about what a healthy marriage looks and feels like. When we start seeing these myths as facts, we get into problematic territory. Many myths create unrealistic standards, which when we bring into our homes and apply to our relationship can hinder them. For instance, if you think you should only attend therapy when your problems are dire, you might be waiting way too long.

Below, Lena Aburdene Derhally, MS, LPC, a psychotherapist and relationship expert, shared three myths and the associated facts, along with several practical tips.
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General

Sleep & Enter Sandman: More Than Just a Song

“You need to improve your sleep hygiene?” my counselor admonished me in her straightforward tone.

“Sure, I probably need to floss more frequently. But I brush my teeth a couple of times a day and always -- always -- before bed,” I cheekily responded.

She was too diplomatic to say what she was truly thinking. I knew.

She furrowed her brow and continued. “Matt, you need to sleep. You can’t function on your current schedule.”
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Depression

How Much Should You Challenge Yourself with Depression?

“When you’re emerging from a depressive episode, how do you know when to push yourself -- in terms of commitments and challenges -- and when to be gentle with yourself?” someone asked recently on my depression community, Project Beyond Blue.

That’s one of the toughest questions facing people who have repeated depressive episodes because, no matter what they choose, they are sure it was the wrong choice. If you don’t take that night course, you feel like you wussed out. But the stress of studying for exams when your cognitive functions are in the toilet doesn’t really get you far either.
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