Research Articles

Relieve Pain, Stress, and Sleeplessness with Japanese Massage Techniques

Monday, January 12th, 2015

male sleeping patterns

Getting a good night’s sleep can seem like an impossible dream for those in chronic pain. And to make matters worse, the situation tends to worsen over time, resulting in a never-ending pain/insomnia cycle. The pain causes sleep deprivation, which in turn weakens the body’s natural pain control mechanisms — leading to more pain and more insomnia.

Since medication is not recommended for long-term use, researchers from the University of Alberta have been exploring low-cost, alternative therapies to help people with chronic pain get better sleep.

Their findings show that self-administered hand shiatsu — a Japanese form of massage, similar to acupressure — can help people in pain fall asleep more quickly and stay asleep for a longer period of time.

Working Out of a Creative Slump, Literally

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Working Out of a Creative Slump, LiterallyMore often than not the advice I’m given when I hit a creative slump is to do more creative things. Make a collage. Write in my journal. Draw or doodle. Read a book or watch a movie. Find a new way to reorganize or rearrange my workspace.

But when I’m not feeling creative, creative fixes don’t sound appealing. The more things fail to sound appealing, the less I do and the bigger the slump. It seems like it will never end, and I start to wonder if maybe I’ve already had all my best ideas.

Hitting a creative block leaves us lost and bored. It can make us doubt our abilities, our choices and our livelihood. You just don’t feel like yourself.

The Hyperbole of Blood Tests & Biomarkers for Depression

Saturday, January 10th, 2015

The Hyperbole of Blood Tests & Biomarkers for DepressionMainstream media love to highlight anytime a researcher suggests we’re on the cusp of developing a blood test, saliva test, or brain scan to “properly” diagnose depression. This is seemingly driven by a never-ending belief that the only way to legitimize mental illness is if we create a medical lab test for it. Nevermind the fact that there are dozens (if not hundreds) of medical diseases that have no single lab test to diagnose them.

Somehow, an MRI will magically make depression acceptable to society. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The latest twist on these tests is a biomarker or blood test that will let us know which treatments may work best for depression. Naturally, such tests raise as many questions as they may answer — and make the process of getting an accurate diagnosis for depression vastly more expensive and complicated.

Psychology Around the Net: January 10, 2015

Saturday, January 10th, 2015

Healing My Inner Child

Happy Saturday, readers!

As cliche as it might sound, we can’t help but think of new beginnings when we think of a new year, and what better way to welcome new beginnings than by keeping up with all the new mental health news, research, and even opinions as we launch into 2015?

After all, we want to stay as healthy and informed as possible!

This week’s Psychology Around the Net features research related to pets and their owners’ personalities, gut bacteria and how it relates to anxiety, how childhood guilt can affect adult mental health issues, and more.

Introverts: You Were Born That Way

Saturday, January 3rd, 2015

Introverts: You Were Born That WayI hate people. I must hate people. I recently took a night class at a local university, and I didn’t learn any of my classmates’ names. I never spoke to any of them. I just knew them by description.

Asian woman with glasses. Asian woman without glasses. Australian woman. British woman. Dude with beard. Dude without beard. Am I a jerk? Maybe. But maybe something else is going on.

I’ve been called many things in my life. Reserved. Shy. I especially like anti-social; my older sister came up with that one (thanks, Jessica).

Are New Treatments for Depression Right Under Our Nose?

Monday, December 29th, 2014

Are New Treatments for Depression Right Under Our Nose?

“The air of ideas is the only air worth breathing.” – Edith Wharton

Yogic breathing, a phone app, and laughing gas may be some of the best new remedies for depression.

Some interesting pilot studies in 2014 are providing hope for the future of depression. Curiously, these new possibilities all involve the mouth and nose. Breathing a certain way, speaking a certain way, and inhaling nitrous oxide all may have potential in reducing symptoms and breaking the cycle of depression.

The Power of Being Self-Compassionate

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The Power of Being Self-Compassionate Think about a time that you were overly critical with yourself. You looked in the mirror and didn’t like what you saw. You told yourself you were too skinny or too fat or even too average.

You picked apart the image looking back at you. Or you forgot something important, or made a mistake and you told yourself you were stupid or incompetent.

Research demonstrates that our brains have a negativity bias, meaning we are more sensitive to negative than positive. This is because in the natural environment, negative signals were a sign of trouble and therefore took up more of our awareness.

New Study: How Long Does It Take to Mend a Broken Heart?

Sunday, December 28th, 2014

heart-pinned-to-wall

Wondering when you’ll feel like yourself again?

You’ve heard it a billion times: “Time heals all wounds.” But when you go through a bad breakup, you’re probably wondering, exactly how much time are we talking?

From losing your appetite to possibly having negative health affects, you’ll probably go through a lot of changes after a relationship ends. So, it’s only natural to want to know how long after a breakup we will start to feel like ourselves again.

Psychology Around the Net: December 27, 2014

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

asian couple talking young bigst

Ah, the weekend after Christmas. Whether or not you celebrate, this Saturday has to be a relaxing time. What better way to decompress than to check out this week’s psychology news circulating the ‘net?

From effective communication to handling rejection, we have a great reading list for you today!

10 Rules You Need to Know to Communicate Effectively: Do you use small words and short sentences? Are you consistent and credible? These and other traits could help you better communicate with others.

Psychology: Why Boredom Is Bad…and Good for You: Although boredom is, well, boring, it can actually help shape important characteristics.

Could Your iPad, Laptop or Kindle Be Keeping You From Sleep?

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Could Your iPad, Laptop or Kindle Be Keeping You From Sleep?

Getting a good night’s sleep is a challenge for many people. Whether it’s constant awakenings throughout the night or difficulty falling asleep or something else, your sleep is the foundation for your mental health. Without regular, deep sleep, you’re not functioning at your best. For most of us, that’s a problem.

We’ve previously reported on research that shows light in your bedroom can interrupt your sleep cycle. Turning off those LEDs and turning down those bright clocks can even help too (something a lot of people miss). And there may be tools to help you improve your sleep even if you use electronic devices at night.

But what about using our iPads, tablets, smartphones, laptops or Kindles before we go to bed?

Preliminary new research suggests you should look at all of your electronic devices just as you’d eye a cup of full-strength coffee an hour before bed — with extreme caution.

Most Depressing Jobs? Bus Driving, Real Estate, & Social Work

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Most Depressing Jobs? Bus Driving, Real Estate, & Social WorkDon’t you ever wonder: “How much more depressing could it be than to do what I do for a living?”

Wonder no more. Researchers looking at insurance claims data in western Pennsylvania finally have the answer to what jobs seem to be correlated with the highest rates of depression.

Top of the list? Those who work in the public transit system (such as buses), real estate, and social work.

What other jobs top the list? And what careers experience the lowest rates of depression?

Psychology Around the Net: December 20, 2014

Saturday, December 20th, 2014

woman armfull books bigst

From holiday gift ideas to dealing with our bosses’ bad moods, today’s Psychology Around the Net is sure to keep you on the edge of your seats!

The Best Psychology Books of 2014: The Guardian writer Lisa Appignanesi provides a list of six of the best psychology books over the past year. (HINT: You might even get one or two holiday gift ideas from this one!)

The Best Christmas Gift Ever: Finding Blessings in Challenges: Speaking of holiday gifts, oftentimes some of our greatest blessings come from our greatest challenges. When have you faced a challenge that turned around and offered you a gift?

Recent Comments
  • June: My husband is hates me because I lose my job therefore, I know longer can pay the rent. We have been married...
  • Wanjiku I.: The article is trying to shed light on a rampant, urgent and horrifying situation in Kenya. Kenya is...
  • Hurt: Emotional affairs can destroy a marriage. It is sad that the modern day technology has allowed people to do...
  • Lauren: Question to anyone…..how to deal with Scoipaths in the workplace? Plus after leaving you decide...
  • sarah: If anyone has some good advice please help me I m a married women my parents n brothers hurt me alotsince long...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 14064
Join Us Now!