Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: March 19, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I hope you've had a fantastic week -- better than mine, anyway. We're having a new roof installed and, well, when you work from home, let's just say it's a bit difficult to concentrate with all the banging, hammering, and stomping. (However, the contractors at least chose some of my favorite classic rock hits to blast, so, there's that!).

Despite all the distractions, I managed to scour the Internet for some fascinating information on new research and reports regarding the happiest countries on the planet, the lesser-known postpartum bipolar disorder, the five different personality types, and more.

Enjoy!

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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: March 12, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I don't know about your neck of the woods, but from where I'm sitting it's a sunshine-filled, 70-degree day, and the last thing I want to do is be indoors!

Still, I suggest you take your phone or tablet or laptop or whatever (oh, technology) outside, because you definitely don't want to miss this week's updates in the world of mental health.

Read on for the latest on how to create habits that revive lost motivation, why binge-watching television could be linked to depression, what some mental health patients have to say about a certain Bernie Sanders comment, and more.

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General

Oops! No ‘Replicability Crisis’ in Psychological Science After All

When you have a research project -- the Open Science Collaboration (OSC) -- that includes 270 scientists working on breakthrough science, you would hope they would get some of the basics correct. Like designing a randomized study that was methodologically sound and could stand up to scrutiny from their peers.

But the ground-breaking article published in August 2015 by 44 researchers, "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science" (Nosek et al., 2015) appears to have had some significant flaws. A new article suggests there actually is no 'replicability crisis' in psychology after all.

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Anger

Psychology Around the Net: March 5, 2016


Happy March, sweet Psych Central readers! Only a few more weeks until the official start of spring here in the Northern Hemisphere, and while I have learned to appreciate all the seasons for what they offer, I'm excited to get back to some warmth and sunshine.

This week, I have a ton of news for you! For example, did you know Chris Stapleton's new hit "Fire Away" tries to foster mental health awareness? Or that control issues can contribute to road rage? What about how being a "hopeless romantic" is actually a good thing for your relationships?

Read on, and enjoy!

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Personality

Research Explains Link Between Romantic Rejection and Sense of Self


One of the most annoying things you can hear when you're dealing with a breakup is "Just let it go." You know you need to move on and get over the heartbreak, but you also need to process those feelings.

Some people are better than others at living a life post-breakup and are more successful at not bringing the rejection and pain they felt from the breakup into their next relationship. But people have a more difficult time releasing the rejection, because it's revealing something about who they really are as a person, new Stanford research has discovered.

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Health-related

6 Ways Texting Can Psychologically Damage You


Seriously. Put your phone down.

Did you know that phones used to be used for making phone calls? Weird, right? People didn't text; they didn't even have any kind of keyboard on their phone.

Calling someone used to be the way that most people communicated with others not in their immediate vicinity. Now, we text. Constantly.

Texting is the preferred way of communicating for many of us. The problem is that texting is actually screwing up our lives. Luckily, an
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Disorders

How Do Mental Illness Diagnoses Really Compare to Medical Diagnoses?

One of the common complaints I hear about mental illness diagnoses is that they are "unscientific," based upon a bunch of subjective symptoms that are arbitrary. People who dismiss mental illness as not being "real" say that unlike medicine, the mental health profession doesn't have laboratory tests, biopsies or meaningful imaging tests.

I would suggest, however, that the mental illness diagnostic reference manual, the DSM-5, is actually a good compromise based upon our current but limited knowledge of mental illness and its underlying causes. Moreover, most people's understanding of medical diagnosis is often unrealistic and doesn't take into account the messy reality.

How do mental illness diagnoses compare to more traditional medical diagnoses?

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Addiction

Psychology Around the Net: February 20, 2016


Good afternoon, Psych Central readers!

First, I have to apologize for the late post. Generally, I try to publish these earlier in the day, but, alas. Technology is a wonderful thing, but unfortunately there are some blips along the way -- and I've had a few connection issues over the last couple of days.

Fortunately, that didn't stop me from collecting some fascinating pieces for you over the week, so let's get down to business, shall we?

Read on for the latest about mountaintop removal's affect on mental health, how your personality affects your taste in music, yet another research report on marijuana use and its contributions to mental illness, and more.

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Dreams

Better Sleep for a Better Life

While getting seven to eight hours of sound sleep each night is easier said than done, there are adjustments you can make to improve your odds of a good night's sleep. And what you do in the hours before you go to bed could matter most.

More than 90 percent of Americans use electronic communications in the hour before they go to bed. Allowing such stressors into your pre-sleep time is only going to keep you awake. A 2014 study suggests that late-night smartphone use is bad for your work the following day. This research found that using a smartphone late at night not only leads to poor sleep but also creates fatigue and lower engagement in the workplace.
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Depression

Does Seasonal Affective Disorder Exist? Can Depressive Symptoms Be Seasonal?

In late January, researchers published the results of their study that seem to call into question whether seasonal affective disorder (SAD) actually exists. Seasonal affective disorder is a type of clinical depression that appears to be related in some way to the changing of the seasons (primarily winter and summer).

The new study contradicts dozens of previous studies that have found evidence that seasonal affective disorder does exist. So how do we square the results of the new study with the previous studies?

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Happiness

Psychology Around the Net: February 13, 2016


Happy Valentine's...er, Weekend, my sweet Psych Central readers!

Yes, whether you love it, hate it, or couldn't care less about it, Valentine's Day is officially upon us.

As such, I've compiled a list of psychology-related articles dealing with why memories of our first loves stick with us, how to spread the love even when you're divorced (or single), why the gift of presence might be the best gift of all, and more.

Enjoy!

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