Children and Teens

ER Beds for Kids Lacking, But School Programs Can Help

Everyone who is a front line clinician in an emergency room (ER) knows the hard reality of the lack of psychiatric services available. Discharging someone from an ER into inpatient mental health treatment is virtually nonexistent for adults. For kids, the situation is usually far worse.

The good news is that if we focus more on preventative care in school -- helping kids and preschoolers long before they have a full-blown diagnosis -- we may be able to stop them from ever having to use an emergency room. All we need do is start making mental health a funding priority for both the states and the federal government.

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Anxiety and Panic

Mental Illness Is More than ‘Worried Wellness’

“So what kind of work do you do in your private practice?” asked a colleague.

“I specialize in depression, anxiety, relationship problems, work-life issues, and low self-esteem,” I explained.

“Ah,” he said with a knowing smile. “The worried well.”

I cringed when I heard this. My patients would cringe, too, if they heard themselves referred to in this dismissive way. But it happens all too often.
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Psychological First Aid for Mental Health: World Mental Health Day

When we think of first aid, we typically think of the kind of aid administered to someone when they've experienced a scrape or bruise, requiring use of a bandage or some other aid to help the wound begin to heal.

But what do people think of when they hear the term, "psychological first aid"? I imagine it's a foreign concept for most people -- that we could provide some sort of psychological help to someone in need. Today, on World Mental Health Day, it's important to better understand this concept as it catches on with people around the world.

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6 Signs You’re a Productivity Addict

Do a search on Google for “productivity” and you’re served up almost 18 million results.

Dive in and you’ll find blogs, websites, apps, op-eds, subreddits, consulting firms, podcasts, and scientific studies devoted to the art of efficiency.

Our obsession in modern society with doing more is rivaled only by our preoccupation with doing it harder, better, faster and stronger. We’re gunning the engines at max speed, cramming our work days full of tasks, then feeling guilty if we steal a quick second to call a friend or read a book for pure pleasure (gasp!).
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Motivation and Inspiration

OCD: “The Bow that You Have to Keep on Tying”

“It just doesn’t feel right. I have to fix it until it is just so!” “I need to figure it out, and once I do, I’ll feel free to move on!” “I have to check all the windows, then I’ll be able to sleep peacefully.” “I have to repeat my prayers until I know God has really heard them.” “Not knowing whether I may hurt my child makes me anxious. I waste too many hours reviewing my behavior to ensure I haven’t harmed her.”

What do those statements have in common?

When individuals experience OCD, accepting uncertainty seems to be the greatest challenge. They have extreme difficulty moving on with their day unless they feel 100% sure the answers to their doubts have been resolved. Whether it is doing something until it feels right, checking or washing, or questioning one’s behaviors, thoughts, or feelings, uncertainty is a main cause for compulsions.
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Stop Blaming Stigma: Take Responsibility for Yourself

Stigma: A set of negative and often unfair beliefs that a society or group of people have about something (Merriam-Webster).

Let’s get the full disclosure out of the way first: I have bipolar disorder (type II, leans far more toward the depressive side than the manic) and borderline personality disorder (would take too long to explain; look it up if you like). I have been on disability for four years because of a nine-month depressive episode for which I received nine months of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It pretty much destroyed my brain. I no longer have a short-term memory of which to speak.

I can’t function in a lot of ways like I used to. I work part-time, for a psychologist who understands my many limitations and helps me work around them. But I could never go back to what I used to do in any aspect of life and expect to handle it like a normal adult.
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7 Tips for Coping with Life After a Hurricane

Life after a hurricane or other natural disaster is rarely easy. Not only do you have to meet your basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter, but such events also take a significant emotional toll. Losing your home or coming back to a home full of water, or that's been significantly damaged, can be devastating.

Six years ago, I wrote some helpful tips on how to cope with a hurricane. I'm updating and expanding upon that list now, as Hurricane Matthew threatens Florida and the entire eastern seaboard of the United States. Here are some helpful ways to cope with life after a hurricane.

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Join Us for World Mental Health Day on October 10 #WMHD

Next week on October 10th, we’re celebrating World Mental Health Day. If you're a blogger, we'd like you to join us for our 6th annual blog party.

World Mental Health Day is promoted by the World Health Organization to help raise awareness about mental health issues. The day promotes open discussion of mental disorders, and what the world’s governments and health organizations are doing in prevention, promotion and treatment services. This year's theme is psychological first-aid, but you're welcomed to blog on any topic in mental health you'd like.

This year, we’re inviting you to join us for the 6th annual blog party on Monday, October 10. Mental health is important to all of us, and we need your help to spread that message! So how do you join in on the party?

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Maybe Vincent van Gogh Didn’t Have Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia After All

A conference convened in Amsterdam earlier this month to once and for all answer the question of whether Vincent van Gogh suffered from some sort of medical problem, such as epilepsy, or mental disorder, such as bipolar disorder, during his lifetime. After all, the famous artist of impressionism cut off his own ear when his friend decided to stop being his roommate. Van Gogh ended up spending the last years of his life in a mental hospital.

The conference of 30 international medical experts released its findings. And they won't sit well with anyone who believed van Gogh was a patron saint of those afflicted with a mental illness.

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Awesome Mental Health Resources You Probably Didn’t Know About

We come across a lot of announcements for this new thing or that, and most of it is garbage. We do, however, like to promote ideas that we feel offer a valuable community service to both mental health consumers and professionals alike.

I've discovered two awesome mental health resources you probably didn't know about, both of which are absolutely free. Whether you like mental health and psychology apps, or psychology and mental books, one of these services can have the potential to change your life.

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