Anxiety and Panic

Fear of Missing Out

In case you didn’t have enough to worry about, there’s a new mental health syndrome on the horizon with a funky acronym. It’s FOMO: the Fear of Missing Out.

Missing out? But on what? On what other people are doing. They’re having exciting experiences that you’re not. They attended the hottest concert in town and you didn’t. Their kids have been accepted into Ivy League schools and yours weren’t. And the beat goes on, and on, and on.

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Anxiety and Panic

4 Strategies for Helping Your Child Cope with Anxiety

Unlike aggression, impulsivity or hyperactivity, anxiety often goes under the radar in kids, said Elizabeth Penela, Ph.D, a psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety in kids. It might be because anxiety typically manifests as somatic symptoms. For instance, kids might have headaches, muscle tension and a queasy stomach, she said.

They can feel anxious about all sorts of things -- from doing well on a test to what their peers will think of them. They also might worry about everyday issues, such as: “Is Mom going to be late to pick me up? Does our car have enough gas? Will I have enough time to clean my room and do homework?”
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Children and Teens

The Secret to Successful Family Relationships

Why do you usually talk to someone? You might assume that your discussions are mostly to exchange information. If you think about your dialogues more carefully, you will notice that almost all your talking really has an alternate goal: to create, develop, or nurture a connection.

For example, a father might ask his young daughter how she slept last night. He probably does not simply mean to inquire just how comfortable the bed was or about the temperature in the room. Dad’s real goal is to express his concern for his child. He asks for the facts about her sleeping in order to demonstrate his love and caring for his daughter.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Could Sugar Make Depression Worse?

I have a theory: Many people who suffer from chronic severe depression and anxiety are allergic to sugar and foods like white flour that the human body processes like sugar.

Like most of my theories, I have tested this one on my 13-year-old son, because his brain is most like mine in our family (poor guy). After he has consumed three pumpkin muffins, his character completely changes, like the Green Goblin (Norman Osborn) in "Spider-Man."
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: September 26, 2015


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

We hope you're enjoying the budding seasonal changes, and that you'll find something interesting in this week's Psychology Around the Net before heading out to enjoy your Saturday!

This week we've got the latest on mental health parity speculation, ways to boost your confidence, how computers are becoming ridiculously accurate at predicting schizophrenia, and more!

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Children and Teens

A Child Therapist’s Perspective on Spanking

So I came across this post on Facebook the other day (I always get good blog ideas when something on Facebook rubs me the wrong way), and it was one of those little e-card pictures that are everywhere. On the picture it said, “I was spanked as a child and I now suffer from a psychological disorder known as ‘respect for others.’” I am sure that this was somewhat tongue-in-cheek and probably a response to all the anti-spankers out there, but it stirred up some anger in me.

One of the most basic rules of statistics is that correlation does not prove causation. Just because you are super awesome, spanking was not the variable that led to you being awesome.
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Anger

Talking with Children about Infidelity

The recent Ashley Madison hack exposed 32 million users for their involvement with the now-famous adultery-inspired dating site. It seems like a relevant time to discuss an issue that’s frequently shoved under the rug or ignored altogether. That issue involves children and marital infidelity. While spouses are obviously greatly affected by romantic affairs, psychologists argue that children may take the brunt of the blow.

If you’ve had an extramarital affair -- or your spouse has cheated on you -- there are obviously personal issues to sort through. In most cases, though, couples try to keep things under wraps and avoid telling friends and family members. However, what do you do with your own children?
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Addiction

Screentime Is NOT Making Kids Moody, Crazy & Lazy

I'm sure Dr. Victoria Dunckley means well with her recent screed entitled "Screentime is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy." She cites research studies to back up her points, and buried in the middle of the article is the common-sense disclaimer that "restricting electronics may not solve everything."

But what Dr. Dunckley misses is how electronics today are to teens what the telephone and TV was to a prior generation (and the radio was to a generation before). The studies she references don't purport to show a casual effect, simply a correlation between two things. Generalizing from such correlations is a mistake too many well-meaning physicians (and even researchers) make.

Screentime is not "making" kids moody, crazy and lazy. Here's why.

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Children and Teens

How to Send Kids off to College without Getting Upset

Many parents are surprised how heartbreaking it is sending their child off to college for the first time. It's natural that parents feel a sense of loss. It usually takes some time to accept that their child is no longer a permanent member of their household. Many of them don't expect the challenges of the empty nest syndrome. Realizing that letting go is the next stage of parenthood can make it easier.

Here is some advice to help parents deal with the emotions evoked by sending their child off to college.

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Depression

Fears of Starting a Family When You Suffer from Depression




How do you manage depression when SSRIs and other medications are not an option?

I try to divorce Michael at least once a month. I blame this on my PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or what I like to call "PMS on crack"), though I've also been diagnosed with chronic depression and anxiety and, once, a psychopharmacologist told me I had obvious bipolar tendencies. Either way, I'm not the easiest person to live with (as if you didn't already feel bad enough for my husband, due to my sexual
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Children and Teens

How Does Parents’ Technology Use Affect Children?

“When my mom and dad are on their phones they act like I don’t exist. It makes me sad. I call and call their names and sometimes they don’t even look up or act like they hear me.”

A child client of mine, 6 years old, told me this during our last session together. This child is sensitive, intuitive, and brilliant. I wondered if a child who was less vulnerable to feeling abandoned would react the same way if his or her parents were on their phones.

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