To End Procrastination, Release Your Mental Resistance

The really happy people are those who have broken the chains of procrastination, those who find satisfaction in doing the job at hand. They're full of eagerness, zest, productivity. You can be, too. ~ Norman Vincent Peale Have you ever noticed how much easier it is to clean someone else’s home instead of your own? There’s no emotional investment: no sick feeling when you look at the mess, no worries about whether or not you’ll get it all done and no concern about whether or not it will stay clean.

Continue Reading

Brain and Behavior

7 Body Language Mistakes that Could Hold You Back at Work

For the past two months, you’ve had your eye on that promotion. It’s between you and your colleague, and you really want the job. So you put in crazy hours, deliver top-notch work, and take on extra projects to show your work. You don’t see any reason it shouldn’t go to you.

But when the time comes for the promotion to be announced, it goes to your colleague instead. What could possibly have gone wrong?

Turns out, it may totally be unrelated to the quality and quantity of the work you churn out. Instead, it could be a factor of something far more subconscious: your body language.
Continue Reading


Helping Someone Else Can Alleviate Depression

Dr. Karl Menninger, the famous psychiatrist, was once asked following a lecture on mental health: "What would you advise a person to do, if that person felt a nervous breakdown coming on?"

Most people thought he would say: "Consult a psychiatrist."

But he didn’t. He surprised everyone when he replied: "Leave your house, find someone in need, and do something to help that person."
Continue Reading


Learning Resilience from Elite Athletes

Did you ever see young athletes who had great potential? They seemed to have all the gifts. You knew they were going to excel, maybe turn professional -- they were that good. But later, to your surprise, you learned they never realized their potential. They were good, but they never made it to the next level.

You may have dismissed it as "bad luck" or bad coaching. Often there is something else missing: an intangible factor. I call it "FACTOR R," for resilience.

Resilience is the ability to bounce back from adversity. In athletics, adversity usually comes in the form of defeat, failure, injury, or even extreme situational stress and pressure.

Continue Reading


How to Take Work Home (The Healthy Way)

Let’s face it: The traditional 9-to-5 work lifestyle is long gone.

For many of us, it’s not unusual to stay at the office until 7 or 8, or to burn the midnight oil working on a freelance gig, startup idea, or extra project to get ahead at work.

Even if your company promotes a healthy work-life balance, your workload may get out-of-control at some point and you’ll simply need to bring work home in the evenings or over the weekend.

Continue Reading


On Living Simply and with Integrity

In her young twenties, writer and activist Eileen Flanagan spent two years teaching English in the country of Botswana, which borders South Africa and Zimbabwe. She ate, lived, and slept in a 180 square-foot mud hut and was quite content.

Then life got a tad more complicated… she married, had kids, and eventually found herself in a three-story house packed full of stuff: Barbie condos, Heelys (sneakers with wheels), Wii games, electronic guitars, and microscopes.

In her engaging new book,
Continue Reading

Brain and Behavior

4 Steps to Stop Seeking Approval from Others

Humans share an innate drive to connect with others. We’re evolutionarily wired to crave inclusion. Eons ago, this was linked with our survival; in prehistoric times, rejection triggered fear. If someone became isolated or was ousted from the group, his or her life would be at risk.

Because the consequences of being rejected were so extreme, our brains and behavior adapted to avoid disapproval from others. In fact, research has shown that social rejection activates many of the same brain regions involved in physical pain, which helps explains why disapproval stings.
Continue Reading


Succeeding in College When You Have ADHD

Navigating the first year of college is hard for anyone, but staying organized and productive is especially difficult for those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). My impulsivity and lack of attention caused me to attend four different schools and declare three different majors.

Once I figured things out, though, I graduated with honors and secured gainful employment. Now I’m five classes away from earning a master’s degree.

Continue Reading

Anxiety and Panic

Affirmations for Reducing Negativity

"Be the change you want to see in the world.” -- Mahatma Gandhi
Do you cringe a little when you hear affirmations? There’s nothing wrong with them, they just seem to be missing substance. You hear a cliche instead of something meaningful.

“You are much more than your opinions of yourself.” I know I’m definitely the kind of person who would roll my eyes at that statement, although I know it's true. It takes a little untangling...
Continue Reading


Use This Psychological Principle to Master Business Networking

As young professionals, we’re taught to network like our careers depend on it. Your professional network can open just about any door. All we have to do to capture that holy grail of networking is put ourselves out there, and then we’re golden.

We’re told to just "start networking," but in reality it’s never that simple. When you’re new to the professional networking scene, figuring out how exactly to create
Continue Reading