Caregivers

Schizophrenia: Delusions, Voices, But Not the Memory Loss

When you hear the word "schizophrenia" a lot of symptoms probably come to mind. Some of them, unfortunately, are sensationalized or completely inaccurate, like "split personality." You might have said hallucinations, hearing voices, being paranoid, and thinking you’re God. Sure, that could be schizophrenia. But what about memory loss?

My brother Pat was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 2006. For a year he thought people were surveilling him, coming into our home to install cameras, listening to his conversations whenever he was outdoors. He didn’t have a reason for it. He didn’t thinking he was a god, a king, or the Second Coming. He believed he was a target for the government -- this was around the time the media began to cover the privacy violations stemming from the Patriot Act.

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Anxiety and Panic

How to Redefine Boundaries to Your Own Personal Freedom

“The boundary to what we can accept is the boundary to our freedom.”

- Tara Brach
I was in the heart of my Ph.D. program when I received the diagnoses: OCD, depression, and binge eating disorder.

It explained a lot, of course. All those years of anxiety, self-doubt, and intrusive thoughts were not normal after all. Eating to the point of gaining forty pounds in a few months was foreign to most people.

I wanted an explanation. Why me?

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Happiness

3-Step Plan for Your ‘Why Me?’ Moments


With a single sentence, life can knock you down. Here's how to get back up and keep swinging...

Have you ever noticed how a single sentence can feel as if a bomb exploded and life as you know it is irrevocably transformed?

A single sentence like:

"It's cancer."
"You're fired."
"I'm pregnant."
"I'm leaving you and filing for divorce."

Suddenly that single sentence, uttered by someone you love or care about, changes your life -- derailing your sense of purpose and direction -- in an instant.
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Brain and Behavior

Psychology Around the Net: February 21, 2015


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

This week's edition of Psychology Around the Net brings you information about the subtle signs of depression, how to change your attitude even when you can't change your circumstances, the connection between being locked up and mental illness and poverty, and more.

(Oh, and we even get an appearance from the Duchess herself!)

Stop Beating Yourself Up for Not Getting Everything Done Every Day: Tired of feeling defeated because you didn't accomplish every last thing on your to-do list? Ask yourself these five questions and you might just feel a little more relaxed at the end of the day.

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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: February 14, 2015


Happy Valentine's Day, Psych Central readers!

For those of you who observe Valentine's Day, we have some interesting information about why single people actually might benefit more than those in relationships.

Oh, and there're are a few more fascinating reads -- from taking a peek at some useful mental health apps to learning how successful people deal with depression.

We hope it provides a great start to your weekend!

It's Better to Be Single On Valentine's Day: Here's one that's sure to drum up some controversy: Philosopher Neil McArthur and author Marina Adshade make several arguments about why it's actually better to be single on this day of celebrating love, going beyond just the economic implications and diving into the "are you or are you not committed to me" realm.

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Alzheimer

Psychology Around the Net: January 31, 2015


This week's Psychology Around the Net will have you rethinking how you look at depression medications, constantly seeking the approval of others, and -- oh, yeah -- whether to have a glass of wine or beer with your dinner (seriously)!

Beer Compound Could Help Fend Off Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: We've all heard about the potential health benefits of wine, but new reports show the compound from hops -- a flower of the hop plant used as a basic ingredient in brewing beer -- could help "protect brain cells from damage -- and potentially slow the development of disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases."

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Brain and Behavior

Is Brain-Training a Hoax?

In a society that glorifies brain-related companies such as Lumosity, it's important to note that while their goal is moral, their process is inherently flawed.

As an Integrative Neuroscience major at Binghamton University, I can understand why parents and children alike fall for the tempting ways to enhance your brain’s functioning. After all, it's no secret that as we begin to age, our memory and other senses begin to fade gradually and sometimes rather abruptly. Nevertheless, the market for these brain-training websites is alive and thriving.

Lumosity prides themselves in being able to "enhance neuroplasticity" through games and other tasks. While their mission statement is not incorrect, it’s not the only route to mental clarity.
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Antipsychotic

Coming to Terms with Your Delusions

I’d be lying if I said I haven’t thought some pretty outrageous things in the course of my illness. I’d also be lying if I said I don’t think about outrageous things still. Even with a good amount of stability, delusions can still persist.

Sometimes it’s about what people think of you, maybe just an offhand notion. Other times it can be so bad that you think you’re a king or a prophet or Jesus Christ himself. I’ve seen every part of the spectrum.

Nine years on, I still deal with whether people are making fun of me. This is a delusion which, no matter what I’ve tried, I can’t stop.
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ADHD and ADD

Adults and ADHD: Reminders for When You’re Feeling Overwhelmed

Clinical psychologist Roberto Olivardia’s clients who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) regularly tell him they feel overwhelmed by everyday tasks. "They feel as if they are in the midst of an avalanche of chores they cannot properly prioritize, organize or execute."

Tasks such as paying the bills, preparing dinner, or getting the car fixed can feel monumental, he said. On top of that, adults with ADHD can feel frustrated seeing others without ADHD accomplish these tasks with little effort, he added. "This leads many with ADHD to feel like they are 'failing at life.'"

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How to Work with Your Dreams

A lot of us are drawn to working with our dreams. Knowing where to start and how to go about it can be confusing. Here are some basic tools to help you with the process.

1. Tell yourself the whole dream. Tell yourself the dream from start to finish so that you have a sense of it as a complete narrative. Dreams sometime seem to open somewhere in the middle -- things are already in process. Capture this information as fully as possible.
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Brain and Behavior

The Power of Music

I’ve known the lows of depression, I’ve known the terror of delusions and paranoia and I’ve known the itchiness of anxiety. In every instance, I know I need to calm down. Most times this means going home pulling the covers up and putting on soft music. I do it so much that it’s become something completely natural. Feeling bad? Put on music. It’s almost automatic and because of that I’ve started to take this simple technique for granted.

Music is something magical. It’s salve for all of life’s emotional wounds and I would be remiss in talking about coping techniques if I didn’t talk about music.
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Habits

How to Use Affirmations to Combat Negative Self Talk


Have you ever pasted up a big sign on your bathroom mirror that says something like, “You are beautiful!” to try to improve your mood and self esteem? And found that it works not at all?

We all have a mean voice inside our heads that criticizes us, often much more harshly than we would ever criticize another person. For many of us, this negative self talk manifests as specific repeating phrases, especially when we are feeling stressed or upset: “You’re such a failure.” “You’re so ugly.” “You can’t do anything right.” You’d never say this to another person, but there it is, knocking around inside your head.

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