Medications Articles

Videos: Antidepressants — Not a Quick Fix

Monday, December 9th, 2013

Videos: Antidepressants -- Not a Quick FixIn a series of heartfelt videos compiled online by healthtalkonline.org alongside research conducted by the University of Nottingham and Oxford University, 30 individuals share that antidepressant medications are not a ‘quick fix.’

Contrary to popular opinion, neither are they ‘happy pills.’

The individuals discuss the impact of depression and antidepressant medications on their lives. They also talk about the emotional difficulties they faced with side effects and finding a prescription that finally helped them manage their depression.

They’re worth checking out to hear of people’s real-life experiences with one of the most commonly-prescribed classes of medications today.

Do I Need to Go Back on Psychiatric Medication?

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

Do I Need to Go Back on Psychiatric Medication?It’s not the first time I have pushed it. This time, it was my (new) son.

After being on a number of different medications for different diagnoses for the past 10 years, I went off my medicine two months into my first pregnancy.

I haven’t known life without medication in 10 years. Except that one time. And let’s just say I was put on a medical leave from university, sent 4,000 miles back to my parents — and it wasn’t pretty. And that’s putting it lightly.

When Should You Go to the Hospital for Severe Depression?

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

When Should You Go to the Hospital for Severe Depression?Knowing when to commit yourself or a loved one to the hospital to be treated for severe depression can be a very gray area. I wish there were a set of directions much like those when you are in labor: if contractions come within five minutes of each other and last a minute, pack your bags.

Some physicians will make the decision for you, but usually it is up to you. Here are a few guidelines.

3 Reasons Why Not All Mental Health Professionals are Created Equal

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

3 Reasons Why Not All Mental Health Professionals are Created EqualThe biggest regret of those who have lived through a depressive or bipolar disorder episode is that they didn’t obtain a rigorous diagnosis and treatment plan early enough.

Lora Inman is one such person, interviewed in my book Back From The Brink. A long-time depression sufferer and passionate mental health advocate, she went for decades without a proper diagnosis or treatment, which prolonged her suffering and made postpartum depression even harder to manage.

Lora’s story perfectly illustrates three very good reasons why you need a trusted mental health professional.

7 Things a Depressed Parent Can Say to a Child

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

7 Things a Depressed Parent Can Say to a ChildI’m usually pretty good at hiding my tears from my kids, but lately I’ve been busted a few times because they come so frequently and don’t go away.

How do I respond when my grade-schoolers ask me why I’ve been crying? How do I explain this insidious illness to them?

Two years ago I wrote a children’s book devoted to these questions. It’s called, What Does Depressed Mean? A Guidebook for Children with a Depressed Loved One.

Excerpted from the book, here are seven things that you can say to your child when you’re depressed.

What One Clinician Learned about Coping with Loss

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

What One Clinician Learned about Coping with LossClinical psychologist Christina G. Hibbert, PsyD, has experienced many losses in her life. When she was 10, her grandfather died. When she was 18, her 8-year-old sister died of cancer.

She experienced the hardest loss when her closest sister and brother-in-law died just two months apart. He died of skin cancer. She died after drinking and taking too many Tylenol.

Around that time Hibbert also lost her aunt to a rare brain disease. Her husband lost his grandmother, both grandfathers and his dad in the span of two years.

“[I]t has been a lot of death for my family. But loss is about so much more than death.”

Are You Struggling with Seasonal Affective Disorder?

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Are You Struggling with Seasonal Affective Disorder? Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) — sometimes known as the “winter blues” — is an “equal-opportunity oppressor,” according to Norman Rosenthal, M.D., in his comprehensive book Winter Blues Survival Guide: A Workbook for Overcoming SAD. This form of clinical depression affects people of all ages — even kids — races and ethnic groups.

Fortunately, SAD is highly treatable. One of the keys to managing the disorder is knowing your personal pattern of symptoms. This plays a big role in how you’ll treat your disorder.

The Biggest Lesson I’ve Learned in Managing My Depression

Sunday, October 27th, 2013

The Biggest Lesson I've Learned in Managing My Depression “Everybody’s depression is different,” said David Blistein, a writer in southern Vermont and author of David’s Inferno: My Journey through the Dark Wood of Depression.

It is a complex disorder, and healing may come from different sources, he said. But when you’re struggling with an illness, it can help to hear how others have survived and thrived.

That’s why we wanted to know the greatest lessons others have learned about managing their illnesses. Below, individuals share everything from the importance of accepting their depression to understanding its powerful influence to discovering one’s inner strength.

Finding Work or a Job When You Have OCD

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Finding Work or a Job When You Have OCDI am generally a pretty positive guy.

A long time ago, when I was talking with a therapist during behavior therapy, I recall she was trying to tell me something about the nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). She said that I seemed very happy talking to her while I was talking to her. However, she said, in the end, after the therapy session, OCD would try to remove the hope I was exhibiting during the session once I walked out to the sidewalk. Reality would take over.

In this article, I argue that it is OCD — and not reality — that tries to systematically remove hope of this particular sufferer. If it doesn’t remove hope about one subject, it systematically moves to the next thing.

Revisiting Glasser’s Controversial Choice Theory

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Revisiting Glasser's Controversial Choice TheoryWhen I was in graduate school, I took a course on Dr. William Glasser’s controversial choice theory. I had never heard of the man before I signed up for the class and had no idea that he was a psychiatrist with some controversial ideas.

Until recently, when I read that Dr. Glasser had passed away, I had completely forgotten about choice theory and my experience in the class. After I read Dr. Glasser’s obituary, I started to think about what had been covered in my course and how I had initially reacted to it.

The first thing I learned about Dr. Glasser was that he did not believe in mental illness. He believed that everything was a choice — that we choose everything we do (even to be unhappy or mentally ill).

Vanity Came Knocking: Being Safe with My Bipolar

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

Vanity Came Knocking: Being Safe with My BipolarI nearly checked myself into the mental ward recently. I’ve been once, and it is no vacation.

But, one ordinary day in September, I was in that much pain. And I didn’t trust myself enough to be safe — all over some vanity and pride.

For the most part, over the years, my bipolar disorder has been tamped down with medication, therapy and stress reduction. And, until that day, I thought I was in remission.

But I was wrong.

OCD: Sometimes It’s Not You, It’s the Situation

Friday, September 13th, 2013

OCD: Sometimes It's not You, It's the SituationVirginia Woolf, the 20th century English author who also suffered from mental illness, once wisely wrote “You cannot find peace by avoiding life.”

Recently, I was talking to my psychiatrist. It was another one of those “Do I or don’t I?” medication moments that people with mental illness routinely have to live with.

He had treated me for my obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) for about six months before I decided to be treated by another facility. I didn’t like the new facility’s recommendations, so I had gone back to this doctor for a second opinion.

Recent Comments
  • Susan: thanks so much for sharing your story. i have suffered from depression since i was 17, i am now 54. i was able...
  • Mark: I like those ways to change our mood. life is full of happiness, a lot of times, we just focus on too much...
  • h: My partner of 9 yrs proposed and gave me a ring and even set a date. When the date came, she started yelling and...
  • Paul Carter: There’s a saying in Chinese medicine that goes “one disease, many treatments, many diseases, one...
  • Willy Sepulveda: To forgive means not to forget, but to accept the fact that it did happen and move forward without...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 8807
Join Us Now!