ADHD and ADD

Too Little Behavioral Therapy for Kids with ADHD

At the end of May, a JAMA report noted that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs shows that about 43 percent of U.S. children and teens received only ADHD medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

That compares to about 13 percent of those treated solely with behavioral therapy -- the best, first-line treatment recommended by every professional treatment guideline and the American Academy of Pediatrics. About 31 percent of children in the survey received both behavioral therapy and medication (the second recommended treatment option).

So the least recommended treatment for children and teens with ADHD is the most commonly used. What's going on here?

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Antidepressant

Psychology Around the Net: May 2, 2015


Learn about mindfulness and depression, how to gauge your emotional intelligence, ways to become happier, and more in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

Mindfulness May Be as Good as Meds for Staving Off Depression: One study suggests mindfulness may be as good as depression medication, perhaps offering an alternative for folks who don't want to take medication long-term.

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Antidepressant

5 More Tips for Dealing with the Overwhelming Fatigue of Depression

One of the hardest symptoms of depression to manage is the overwhelming fatigue. Everything seems to require so much effort, which you just can't access. It feels like you're moving through mud. It might take longer to complete projects at work or chores at home. Getting off the couch or out of bed may feel impossible.

The key is to have your depression properly treated. And with treatment, you'll start to feel better and gain more energy. But there are things you can do on your own, in addition to working with a therapist and/or taking medication.
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Antidepressant

Psychology Around the Net: April 18, 2015


Can you spot a genuine smile from a fake one? How much do you know about creating a mental health plan for your child before college? What about true happiness -- do you actually experience it?

Learn about these topics and more in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

Psychology of Smiling: Can You Tell a Fake Smile From a Genuine One? Psychologist Richard Wiseman and his new photographic test for checking empathy will help you find out.

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ADHD and ADD

Too Many Preschoolers Getting Medications for ADHD

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has just published its first national study on the various forms of treatment used for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The study examined the use of medication, behavioral therapy, and dietary supplements -- and its results were eye-opening.

Almost 1 in 4 preschoolers were treated with medication alone.

That is an astounding number, when you stop and consider that a preschooler's brain is still under active development. Prescribing stimulants to such a young child's brain is a bad idea, given we have no longitudinal, long-term studies demonstrating that these medications won't be harmful in a child's development.

Read on to learn more about the study's key findings.

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Antidepressant

Why Success Sometimes Starts with Failure

Every year, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation holds a Fail Fest, where they celebrate a valuable lesson they learned while investing money into a loser organization that has absolutely bombed. According to this brilliant team, failure is chock-full of wisdom -- one of the most effective way to absorb key insights -- so it’s best to sit down with that uncomfortable feeling for awhile and explore what went wrong.

I have always loved stories of failure -- much more than tales of success. Nothing has ever come easily to me.

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ADHD and ADD

ADHD Could Lead to Obesity

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could be at greater risk of becoming obese, a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry shows. "We found that ADHD was a risk factor for later obesity," said Alina Rodriguez, a visiting professor at Imperial College London, UK, whose recent study found that children with ADHD symptoms were less likely to engage in physical activity and more likely to become obese as adolescents.

This may sound counterintuitive to the image most people have of a child with ADHD: sprightly and in constant motion. How could someone who can’t sit still ever become lethargic and paunchy?
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ADHD and ADD

Pharmacogenetic Testing May Change Psychiatric Treatments for ADHD, Depression


Prescribing medications has long been a trial-and-error approach for nearly any medication you could take. That's been especially true in psychiatry, where there are dozens of medications that could be prescribed for common mental health concerns, such as anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

What if doctors had a better idea ahead of time which medications may work better for you than others, based upon your unique biology and biochemical makeup? They could then make prescribing decisions with a lot more knowledge, finding you a medication that would have a higher chance of working the first time.

This process is called pharmacogenetic testing -- and it's time is fast approaching.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Getting Over the Fear of Taking Medication for Depression

Nine years ago I decided to wean off all my meds and take natural supplements instead.

One evening I was fixing a magnesium concoction, chatting with a friend. We were talking about my depression, and this new holistic route I was taking.

"You have everything you need inside you to get better," she said.

Yeah, I suppose I do, I thought. I mean, why would God create you with some missing pieces?
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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Depression: A Forever-Kind of Illness

I overheard my husband describing my health to someone on the phone the other day.

"She’s definitely better," he said. "She’s trying a lot of new things. It’s hard to say what’s helping the most."

"Well, she’ll always have it. I mean, it will never go away completely. But she’s able to manage her symptoms as of late. She’s able to get out of bed in the morning and go to work."

Wow, I thought to myself, he gets it. He truly gets it.
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