Addiction

I Miss Booze

I was never a big drinker; certainly, drinking was never a problem for me.

I started drinking beer with my older brothers and hating it. It was not until I’d consumed it for a couple of years that I began to love it. We’d drink beer down by the river, standing around a huge bonfire, our fronts toasty and our backs cool in the fall air.
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Antidepressant

A New Development: Depression Mixed with Anxiety

Since I've been diagnosed with bipolar illness (1991), I've lived in lots of "states" -- I've been high; I've been low; I've existed in a horrible mixed state of high (mania) and low (depression), in which the key emotions were anger and irritability.

But recently, I experienced a new state--depression mixed with anxiety, and let me tell you, this might have been the most debilitating state of all.
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Antidepressant

Exercise Can Improve the Quality of Life in People with Depression

A recent study has shown that exercise improves the physical and psychological quality of life in people suffering with depression. Whilst exercise is considered to be a good anti-depressant for depression, little research has been conducted into its effect on the different domains of Quality of Life (QoL).

Depression is a chronic condition that has a huge impact on an individual’s physical and mental health which inevitably impacts their QoL.
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Antidepressant

PODCAST: Aspirin, Yes; Psych Meds, No – Why the Difference?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, Gabe and Vincent discuss why so many people stop taking medication for psychiatric disorders or even refuse to start on them at all.  In a society that is always searching for a “magic pill,” why are so many people resistant to the idea of taking medication to treat mental illness?  Why do doctors and others so easily dismiss the complaints of side effects?  And does stigma prevent many from getting the treatment they need?  Gabe and Vincent give advice and reassurance on how to cope with the many pitfalls of being “med compliant.”

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Antidepressant

Could an Antidepressant Prevent Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury?


The prevalence and functional effects of depressive disorder following traumatic brain injury are significant. Now, sertraline may be effective for preventing depressive symptoms after TBI.

A group of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine evaluated 94 patients aged 18 to 85 years who had been hospitalized for mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most of the patients (n=92) were Caucasian and more than half (n=56) were male. The research team randomized the patients to receive either 100 mg daily of sertraline (48 patients) or placebo (46 patients) for 24 weeks or until symptoms of a mood disorder occurred.

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Antidepressant

Top 5 Most Common Myths about Taking Antidepressants


Don't be ashamed to get the help you need -- however you need it.

As a person who has depression, is on medications, and is in therapy (I swear, I’m sane!), I’ve had many people comment on my use of antidepressants, or spout myths around me about medications for depression that simply aren’t true.

To put it simply: I'm tired of hearing it and feeling awkward having to correct them or inform them concerning their mistakes. (But hey, you live and you learn, I guess?)

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Antidepressant

There Is a Place for Antidepressants

When I was six months pregnant, I attended a birthing preparation class with my husband and about 12 other expectant parents. During the fifth session, the instructor asked the mothers whether or not they were going to use medication to get through the pain of childbirth labor.

“Everyone who wants to try for a natural birth, stand over here,” she said. “And everyone who plans on having an epidural or taking other pain medication, stand over here.”

I looked at the two groups, which held about the same number of people. My head went from one to the other, much like a puppet with a tic. Like most decisions in my life (including which dressing I want on my salad), I had analyzed the hell out of this one -- done all the research on both sides -- and still couldn’t commit.
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Addiction

Does Depression Turn Self-Medication into Addiction?

The term self-medicating simply means using a substance or engaging in a behavior to satisfy a physical or psychological need.

Quite often, though, self-medicating means relying heavily on legal or illicit substances, like alcohol or drugs. As a manifestation of addiction, such self-medication is especially problematic for patients with depression.

Those who battle depression, and especially those who are predisposed to addiction, may try self-medicating before or instead of seeking professional help, which can...
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Antidepressant

6 Antidepressant Side Effects I Didn’t See Coming


To say it's a game-changer would be the understatement of the year.

In recent years, depression had become more widely understood. This has been, in many ways, fantastic for those of us who suffer from what is sometimes referred to as "the black dog." At other times, it can be frustrating, because there's more to depression that people outside it first suppose.

Everyone is familiar with the numbness, the crying and the suicidal thoughts -- the head stuff, if you like. Those of us stuck with it also know there's more to it than that, but it's difficult to know exactly what.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Employment as an Antidepressant

The ads pushing pills are everywhere. It's difficult to avoid images of what we're supposed to believe happiness looks like. A pill a day keeps depression away.

I wish it were so simple.

For many of us, a pill a day keeps other things away. Enjoyable things, necessary things, even normal body processes. For some of us, the side effects from these pills are too much to handle, their ill effects negating any good the pills may do.

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