Industrial and Workplace Articles

Why Positive Affirmations Don’t Work

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Why Positive Affirmations Don't WorkControl your thoughts and you create your reality. A positive mindset begets positive end results.

These popular tenets are espoused by the likes of Louise Hay, Napoleon Hill, Anthony Robbins and countless other self-help gurus. The problem is, they don’t actually work.

Consider the last time you really wanted something to happen… It could be a dream job, an ideal relationship or even a parking space in the city.

The 5 Negative Types of People I Have Met on My Recovery Journey

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

The 5 Negative Types of People I Have Met on My Recovery JourneyI have read countless books on self-actualization, self-realization and spiritual awareness. I have done hundreds of hours of yoga, pranayama (breathing practices) and meditation. I have worked with therapists, energy workers, acupuncturists and a million body workers. All of this has been helpful, even critical, to my recovery.

One of the primary spiritual premises I have heard is that the universe will give me exactly what I need. Sounds great, doesn’t it?

In my early years of recovery, I thought that had something to do with the physical world. Of course, as a trauma survivor, it was pretty hard to believe. Actually, I didn’t believe it. Or at least, I didn’t believe it applied to me.

7 Tips for Setting Boundaries At Work

Monday, March 10th, 2014

7 Tips for Setting Boundaries At WorkMany of us spend the majority of our days at work. That work also can bleed into our life at home. So creating boundaries around our workplace is critical.

It also shows your boss, clients and colleagues that you have a backbone, said Melody Wilding, LMSW, a therapist who works with young professionals and business owners.

When you respect your personal boundaries, others typically will, too. Remember that “you teach people how to treat you.”

But creating boundaries at work can get tricky because there’s the real worry of being demoted or fired. Yet with clear communication, practice and preparation it can be done.

5 Difficult Workplace Types & How to Get Them to Cooperate

Sunday, March 2nd, 2014

5 Difficult Workplace Types & How to Get Them to CooperateThe workplace is filled with difficult personalities — bullies, know-it-alls, rumor mongers… Our fallback reaction when faced with problem people at work is to either assert ourselves or walk swiftly in the other direction.

But there’s a middle ground, a way of communicating that’s more effective, because it’s not rigid or oppositional. It’s about being fluid, surrendering to your intuition, and letting go of your need to push back or control the outcome. Your ability to go with the flow is really important when dealing with difficult people.

In my new book Ecstasy of Surrender, I describe five difficult workplace types and some communication strategies for each type.

Self-Protection in a Bully-Prone Workplace

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Self-Protection in a Bully-Prone WorkplaceIf you are looking for a new job, or have just started one, it pays to read the signs of a bully-prone workplace early so that you can take adequate steps to protect yourself against bullying before it happens.

Conservatively, one in three workers have experienced bullying and one in two have witnessed it. You are likely either to be on the receiving end of bullying, or watch a colleague being bullied at some point.

So what are some of the common signs of a bully-prone workplace?

Talk the Talk: 10 Tips for Starting Therapy

Sunday, February 23rd, 2014

Talk the Talk: 10 Tips for Starting TherapyA friend of mine recently told me about her experience of starting psychotherapy. She said she would have liked a list of pointers to help her understand what she was getting into before she started. That sounded like a good idea to me.

It’s not uncommon to want a few signposts when we start a journey. Inspired by her, here are 10 things I think might be helpful to you if you’re new to, or thinking about, therapy.

Fearful & Frozen: Why Victims Don’t Act to Stop Bullying

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Fearful And Frozen: Why Victims Don’t Act to Stop BullyingOn January 1, 2014 in Australia, anti-bullying legislation was introduced. Workers now can apply to to the Fair Work Commission (FWC) for an order to stop the bullying. Once an application has been received, the FWC has two weeks to investigate the complaint.

Legislators expected an overwhelming demand: Bullying affects over 30 percent — more than 3 million — Australian workers and costs the economy between $6 billion and $36 billion dollars a year.

It seemed reasonable to expect that applications should have numbered in the thousands by now when results from a parliamentary inquiry in 2012-13 showed that workers’ most desired outcome was that they just wanted the bullying to stop.

However, only 44 applications have been received so far in 2014, six of which were withdrawn. Why?

Disclosure in the Workplace: An Interview with Lisa Clark Keith

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

Disclosure in the Workplace: An Interview with Lisa Clark KeithShould someone with a mood disorder disclose her condition to her manager or anyone with whom she works?

After more than twenty years in the professional world, having worked a variety of occupations in different kinds of settings, I still don’t know the answer to that. I experienced thick stigma and shame when I disclosed my bipolar disorder; however, I also received support that I wouldn’t have if I’d kept everything to myself.

For her doctoral dissertation in psychology, professor Lisa Clark Keith interviewed five women with mental illness who disclosed their conditions in their workplaces. What did she learn?

7 Steps to Surviving Job Loss

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

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Losing your job hurts.

Companies use fancy terms to describe it – downsizing, reorganization, consolidation, …

8 Ways to Find Real Happiness at Work

Sunday, February 2nd, 2014

8 Ways to Find Real Happiness at WorkMost adults spend more waking hours at work than anywhere else. If you are unhappy there, you are unhappy a major chunk of the time.

Sharon Salzberg, renowned meditation teacher and cofounder, with Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein, of the Insight Meditation Society, has just released an invaluable resource on finding happiness at work. Real Happiness at Work includes practical techniques and practices for people who hate their jobs, love their jobs, or don’t care enough to belong to either group.

Her pages speak to folks seeking meaning and fulfillment in their occupations, even if their responsibilities consist of scrubbing down toilets. Here’s what she found — and how you can find real happiness at work.

Why Making Comparisons Hurts You More Than It Helps

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Why Making Comparisons Hurts You More Than It HelpsAt the start of a new year, many people make resolutions and are inspired to make changes in their lives. This year my resolution is to have no resolution.

The problem with resolutions is that it can place you on a dangerous course of comparison. We constantly compare images, status, children, wealth, skills or values.

Although dangerous, comparison also is quite essential for our growth and development. We all need a parent, teacher, friend, pastor or role model to guide us and teach us. Most times your mentor knows something more than you, hence the comparison: you know more; I know less. Therefore, I want to know what you know. There’s also the triple comparison: he is “better” than me, but I’m “better” than she.

One tricky comparison is that of suffering. For example, someone’s family member dies and another person’s marriage is over. Though different, both are experiencing the same feelings of pain, grief and loss. To compare the extent of one’s trials is not so important, in my opinion.

Adults & ADHD: 7 Tips for Finishing What You Start

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Adults & ADHD: 7 Tips for Finishing What You StartBecause of the nature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), adults with the disorder quickly lose interest in what they’re doing. The ADHD brain gets bored easily and needs novelty (this helps to boost dopamine levels, which are low in people with ADHD).

Of course, this doesn’t bode well for wrapping up tasks.

The need for newness also means that adults with ADHD often start many different projects and simply get too busy to finish them all, according to Sarah D. Wright, a life coach who specializes in working with people who have attention disorders.

Plus, they can get stuck on a task, because they’re unsure of how to move forward, she said.

In order to finish what you start, it helps to have support and get clear on the parameters of your project. Below, Wright revealed how to do just that, along with other specific tips for following through.

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