Industrial and Workplace Articles

What is Practical Mental Health Parity?

Saturday, February 14th, 2015

depression-means-no-health-insuranceMuch has been written in the last several years about the advances in access to mental health care as a result of federal mental health parity laws. These legislative reforms affect individuals and families with private health insurance coverage. While I certainly applaud any reforms that remove restrictions for pre-existing conditions and mandates that mental health conditions be treated with the same level of coverage as physical conditions, much work still needs to be done.

Inadequate provider networks

With this thought in mind, during the month of January Care For Your Mind (CFYM) invites its readers to consider a need for “Practical” Parity. In the January 13 post, Carolyn Beauchamp, President of the Mental Health Association of New Jersey asks, “If access is lacking, do we have mental health parity?” In this informative post, Ms. Beauchamp shares the results of a survey conducted in New Jersey that reveals how difficult it can be to obtain a new appointment with a psychiatrist due to incorrect contact information and an unwillingness of doctors to accept new patients.

The Scary Side of Sitting

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Young woman sitting on sofa with electronic padThere is a growing scientific consensus that the more time you spend sitting, the shorter and less healthy your life may be. Excessive sitting, such as at an office desk, in front of the TV, even driving while commuting can significantly affect your cardiovascular and metabolic function.

Your mental health is intricately connected to the amount of time you spend sitting. One study after another continues to reveal that your risk for depression soars the longer you are sedentary. Sitting also increases psychological distress, and decreases feelings of well-being, a problem that fortunately can be rectified.

The Key to Being Productive at Work

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Businesswoman in office pointing at monitor with notes on itThere’s lots of advice on managing our time, getting organized and creating efficient to-do lists for becoming more productive. I explore these topics regularly on Psych Central.

However, according to psychiatrist and ADHD expert Edward M. Hallowell, M.D., these suggestions only scratch the surface. What we really need to do to be more productive is to retrain our attention. We need to delve into the deeper reasons we get distracted at work.

In his newest book Driven to Distraction At Work: How to Focus and Be More Productive, Dr. Hallowell identifies the six most common distractions: electronic devices, multitasking, idea hopping, worry, trying to fix everyone’s problems and underachieving. He presents these distractions in the first half of the book and shares practical solutions for each type of distraction.

Managing the Fear and Anxiety of the Unknown

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Best of Our Blogs: July 16, 2013Almost everybody worries about what will happen in the future. Remember that no one can predict the future with 100 percent certainty. Even if the thing that you are afraid of does happen, there are unpredictable circumstances and factors which can be used to your advantage.

For instance, let’s say at work that you miss the deadline for a project you have been working on for the last few months. Everything you feared is coming true. Suddenly, your boss comes to your office and tells you that the deadline is extended and that he forgot to tell you the day before. This unknown factor changes everything. Remember that we may be 99 percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference.

Why Do Therapists Charge So Much?

Monday, February 9th, 2015

therapist_negativeThe world can be a stressful place. You are feeling overwhelmed, and nothing seems to be working consistently. You’ve reached out to friends and family. They may have helped a little, but not enough. Perhaps friends or family are somehow associated with your stress, which leaves fewer people in whom to confide.

The day has come when you finally decide to seek help to get where you want to be. As you type “psychotherapist” into your search engine, you feel a strange mix of anxiety, apprehension, and determination. Next, you find someone who seems to be a good fit for what you hope to accomplish in therapy. Finally, you’ve gained the courage to call or meet with this so-called expert, who has brought you at least some relief through validation and, perhaps, recommendations. As you get to the end of the free consultation, you ask about fees.

Simple Tips & Tweaks for Creating a Productive To-Do List

Saturday, January 31st, 2015

to do listI love lists. And I make many of them. I make lists of my daily tasks. I make lists of the articles I need to write each month — both in a Word doc and in a separate notebook. I make lists in most of my blog posts. I make lists for different projects. I make lists for the grocery store. I make lists of the bills I need to pay and write down when I’ve paid them. I make lists of books I’d like to read. I probably make lots of other lists that simply aren’t coming to mind right now.

With my penchant for listmaking, it seems I’ve found a kindred spirit in Paula Rizzo, the founder of ListProducer.com and author of the new book Listful Thinking: Using Lists to be More Productive, Highly Successful, and Less Stressed.

10 Ways to Win the War Against Workplace Stress

Monday, January 26th, 2015

10 Ways to Win the War Against Workplace StressWorkplace stress is one of the most common forms of stress. In order to cope with it, you need to accept that your job is the cause of your stress. Only when you come out of your denial can you overcome this form of stress.

Here are some tips you can use to deal with workplace stress:

1. Take on only as much work as you can do. Promotions and incentives notwithstanding, your health should be important to you. You should know what your limit is, and then you should work within that limit. If you just give your nod to work that you can realistically do, then you will be much happier with your job.

The Power in Being Still & How to Practice Stillness

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

3 Ways to Develop A Spiritual PracticeToday, stillness can be hard to come by. There’s just so much going on. So much noise both inside and outside our brains. So many tasks on our to-do lists. At least several screens within reach.

But stillness is still possible. It, too, is within our reach whenever we need it.

You can cultivate stillness while walking on a busy street, while chaos swirls all around you.

Most Depressing Jobs? Bus Driving, Real Estate, & Social Work

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Most Depressing Jobs? Bus Driving, Real Estate, & Social WorkDon’t you ever wonder: “How much more depressing could it be than to do what I do for a living?”

Wonder no more. Researchers looking at insurance claims data in western Pennsylvania finally have the answer to what jobs seem to be correlated with the highest rates of depression.

Top of the list? Those who work in the public transit system (such as buses), real estate, and social work.

What other jobs top the list? And what careers experience the lowest rates of depression?

When Things Don’t Turn Out How You’d Hoped, Expected or Planned

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

When Things Don’t Turn Out How You’d Hoped, Expected or PlannedMaybe you took a job that was supposed to be fulfilling, but you dread going to work. Maybe you studied intensely for many months but still didn’t pass the bar. Maybe you thought you’d be married by now, but you aren’t even dating anyone. Maybe you poured your heart into a project or relationship only to get fired or break up. Maybe you and your kids aren’t as close as you were before.

When life doesn’t turn out the way we’d hoped, planned or expected, we feel tremendous disappointment and start doubting everything, including ourselves, writes Christine Hassler, a life coach and speaker, in her book Expectation Hangover: Overcoming Disappointment in Work, Love and Life.

Are You Working for a Psychopath?

Monday, December 8th, 2014

talking_to_boss.original

Every boss has his or her moments when grumpiness or a negative attitude takes hold, causing them to lash out. Our superiors are human, after all, and they are entitled to bad days just like anyone else.

But have you ever worked for someone who seemed to constantly run hot and cold: charming and funny one second, then vicious and manipulative the next? If a power-wielding bully dominates your workplace, you could very likely be working for a psychopath.

Too Stressed to Meditate

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Too Stressed to MeditateFor the past couple of years, meditation has been easy. I’d put in some hard work over the previous decade and had found a place of stillness each time I took to the cushion. Sure, sometimes what I met as I observed my mind was difficult, but my practice had become productive and indispensable.

I spent the last two years as a stay-at-home dad of a toddler. I did all of the dad, and much of the mom, stuff. I managed the house, cleaned (badly), cooked (very well), arranged activities and play dates, and did what I could to keep the family satisfied.

None of this was easy, but my daughter napped every day. And while she napped I had a solid 35 minutes to meditate, without fail. I taught a couple of classes each week, and led a Wednesday night drop-in meditation group, but that was more rewarding and fulfilling than taxing.

Then it all came to an end.

Recent Comments
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