Patience Required

Several years ago, when ordering a fish sandwich in a fast food joint, I was told it would take a while. “How long?” I inquired. “About a minute.”

A minute. I have to wait a whole minute! I don’t know if I can handle that!

Nowadays, requests for patience have shrunk to “wait a second!” And quite often, the answer is, “No, that’s too long!”

Think I’m kidding? How many times have you surfed the Web, clicking on another site if the download didn’t happen immediately? How many times have you skimmed your emails, deciding what to delete in less than a second?
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5 Easy Ways to Practice Gratitude Throughout the Day

The benefits of practicing gratitude are innumerable. It helps release toxic emotions such as frustration, envy, regret and resentment while increasing sensitivity and empathy toward others. Being grateful also improves self-esteem and personal relationships by reducing social comparisons and supporting prosocial behavior.

While it’s common knowledge that cultivating gratitude is good for us, it’s not common practice for many of us. Here are five ways to change that.

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Mental Health in America: A Shakespearean Tragedy

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 16 million adults in the United States experienced at least one major depressive episode in 2012. Major Depressive Disorder is defined as “Depressed mood and/or loss of interest or pleasure in life activities for at least two weeks and symptoms that cause clinically significant impairment in social, work, or other important areas of functioning almost every day.”

Along with diagnostic criteria for depression, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V is also notorious for a whole doctrine of pathologies under which the field of psychiatry preaches its creed; a grim gospel for any ardent disciple to follow. Social factors, environmental triggers, and increased stress in modern life all influence mental health, including the onset of depression. With healthcare expenditures approaching $3 trillion, our disorders and diseases are helping to keep the U.S. economy rolling.

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How to Make Your Relationship Run Smoothly

In order to make your relationship run smoothly, you need to know what you need and want. Since your partner is not a mind-reader, it's important to express your deepest desires instead of avoiding them. But communicate your feelings and thoughts in a mature and productive way in order to avoid a big argument. The following suggestions will lay the groundwork for effectively maneuvering through those triggering times:
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Brain and Behavior

Embracing Your Inner Self

Embrace and make peace with life because in this very moment you are right where you were meant to be. We have the opportunity to grow and learn from the past and create an amazing future.

Growing up, I never felt good enough. Not only was this my internal dialogue but it was reiterated by my father. So for years I had to learn how to embrace positive cognitions and self-talk. It hasn’t come naturally to me, but with time and coaching I learned how to embrace myself and take control of my life.

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ADHD Overdiagnosis? Most Done After Checklists, Neuropsychological Testing

A lot of people have gotten this idea -- myself included -- that a diagnosis for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pretty easily obtained. I've been led to believe this by media hype about the "overdiagnosis" of ADHD. Some journalists I've spoken to in the past believed this so insistently, they based their entire story around the premise.

But what if the common wisdom and journalists are wrong?

What if most ADHD diagnoses are made after careful consideration of a child or teenager's actual behaviors, verified through a behavior rating scale or checklist? What if most children who receive an ADHD diagnosis actually go through neuropsychological testing too? What if, before giving an ADHD diagnosis, most parents were also questioned about their child's behavior in different settings too?

Could so many diverse measures and datapoints all be wrong?

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Children and Teens

What I Learned from Slowing Down

On a daily basis, there are tragic events happening all across the world. We read it in the newspaper, see it on television, hear it on the radio, and even see it on our Twitter feeds. These tragic events, even from just reading about them, can make us feel sad, depressed and even helpless.

Reading about all of the atrocities in the world makes me want to give as many kids water, education, electricity and Internet access as possible. Yet I also feel trapped in my own world. I am frozen in ice about how to act. I want to help, but it really is not time for me to do so.

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Think Twice Before You Label Events as Good or Bad

There is a Taoist parable about an old farmer who owned one beautiful horse. One day, this beloved horse ran away. His neighbors, upon hearing the news, came over to give their condolences. “We are so sorry,” they said. “How terrible this must be for you.”

He replied with a simple “Maybe.”

A few days later, the lost horse came back with three wild horses. His neighbors rushed to his home. “How wonderful! You are so very fortunate!”

The old farmer just said “Maybe.”
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Healthy and Unhealthy Anger

You know the feeling: that raw emotion that ebbs up when things aren’t going your way. It could be anywhere from a momentary annoyance with another (or with yourself) to uncontrollable rage.

Typically, anger is stirred up by frustration. You’re not getting what you want or deserve. Frustration may stem from healthy, legitimate needs (such as the need to be treated respectfully); from depression, which may be an outward expression of anger (such as realizing that you've taken all the blame but now realize that it’s not all you); or from narcissistic, false entitlement needs (feeling that you should be able to spend as much as you want regardless of your income).

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