Anger

Re-Visioning Strength: What It Really Means to Be Strong and Why It’s Important


In this year’s election cycle, there is understandable anxiety about terrorism. Political candidates are competing to reassure voters that they are the strongest candidate and have the best plan for keeping us safe.

This raises some interesting psychological issues. How do we react when our sense of safety and well-being are threatened? What does it mean to be strong in the face of danger? What is a wise response to a difficult or scary situation?

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Binge Eating

7 Surprising Quirks You Didn’t Know About Binge Eating

Binge eating disorder (BED) is one of the most common eating disorders, yet it wasn't included as an official diagnostic category until 2013, when the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Ed. (DSM-5) was published. Prior to 2013, it was listed simply as a diagnosis needing further study -- despite millions of Americans suffering from it. Binge eating is commonly defined as consuming a large amount of food in a short period of time, while experiencing a loss of control over eating.

What are some of the less commonly known quirks of binge eating disorder?

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Addiction

Psychology Around the Net: January 16, 2016


Hey, Psych Central readers!

So, a lot of stuff happened this week. Some of it, pretty exciting (we finally got a few Powerball winners!); some of it, downright heart-wrenching (rest in peace, Alan Rickman and David Bowie).

For our purposes (which I have to admit, was a nice distraction from losing Professor Snape and Ziggy Stardust in one week), I've dug up some pretty interesting little psychology bits for you to feast on this morning.

Keep reading for information on how winning the lottery probably won't make you happier, working long hours doesn't always negatively affect relationships, the ways in which dogs recognize human emotions, and more!

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Anxiety and Panic

4 More Things that Create or Boost Your Anxiety

In many ways we create our own anxiety. It might be our habits or the actions we take. It might be our perspective on everything from traveling on airplanes to how life works. The good news is that we can do something about these triggers—instead of letting them generate needless anxiety, sink our mood and rule our lives.

Below, counseling psychologist Rosy Saenz-Sierzega, Ph.D, shared four potential triggers and how we can reduce or navigate them healthfully.

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Bipolar

A Friend Lost and Found

Often, after one develops a mental illness, one may lose friends. This happened to me. I lost a childhood friend who was with me when I experienced a nervous breakdown. I was in New York City when it happened. I completely and totally lost touch with reality.

Pam was driving me to the airport, and she had the radio on. I kept hearing the DJ mention my first and last name. This was sending me into hysterics. Of course, the DJ was not saying my name. I was mishearing or hallucinating or a combination of both.

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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Parenting: Teaching Your Kids to Regulate Their Emotions

On the outside, when a child with ADHD is having an outburst, it might look like they’re misbehaving on purpose. They’re kicking, screaming, crying and throwing their toys. Or maybe it’s the opposite: They’ve completely shut down.

But there is nothing intentional about these behaviors. Kids don’t want to get angry or act out. “Their brains are actually wired to [over-react],” said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in ADHD.
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Addiction

How to Write a Daily Journal in Two Minutes or Less

Keeping a journal is often recommended as a powerful tool to aide addicts on their road to recovery. Journals not only help patients reflect on and express their feelings, but also to examine ways to avoid relapse.

However, many patients don’t stick with journaling because it can be a tedious practice. I work as an addiction psychiatrist, and I have developed a highly effective method of journaling that takes two minutes or less every day. This method offers patients personal accountability to understand the cycle of addiction.

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Depression

Surviving January — the Most Depressing Month of the Year

January 24 is on record as being the most depressing day of the year. It’s not hard to figure out why. The bills come in from all those generous gifts you gave back when the holiday spirit had you feeling rich. The resolutions you made on December 31 are, well, broken. And it’s cold, dark, and dreary -- the roads wear the kind of brown slush that is unbecoming.

However, my mood dips long before the 24th. It does a dive the Monday after the New Year -- the first full week of January. I call it Yuck Monday or Yuck Week.
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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Natural Remedies for Rapid Relief of Anxiety

Excerpted and adapted from Anxiety: Top Tips For Rapid Relief Of Anxiety, Panic, Nervousness, and Worry by Lance Levan
Some forms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have proven to ease the stress of anxiety, based on research studies. Complementary medicine includes strategies that are not routinely used in Western medicine, although some doctors are favorable towards these methods.

Here are examples of several types of CAM that are used frequently to treat people with anxiety:

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Disorders

Talk Therapy: It’s Not Just Talk

It’s not unusual for people to be hesitant to try talk therapy.

“If I want to talk to somebody, I’ll talk to my friends,” gripes Nicole. “I’m not going to talk to a complete stranger. What for? It’s stupid!”

“If you’ve got troubles in this world, you just have to deal with them,” roars Ben. “What would talking about it do? You have to suck it up and deal with it, not whine about it.”
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Anxiety and Panic

5 More Ways to be Kind to Yourself When You’re Anxious

So many of us judge ourselves for being anxious. We think we’re weak. We think we’re being stupid or ridiculous. We think we shouldn’t feel this way -- and ironically, these thoughts only exacerbate our anxiety.

According to clinical psychologist Karin Lawson, PsyD, “When someone is judging themselves for having feelings, then it doesn't allow space to figure out how to soothe and move through the emotion.”

She shared this analogy: A person is experiencing physical pain in her arm. She purposely tenses up and tightens her arm muscles to power through it. But this just layers the pain and creates more discomfort.
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