Anxiety and Panic

How Bad Is Your FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)?

Have you ever wondered how bad your fear of missing out (FOMO) really is?

As a reminder, the fear of missing out is the psychological phenomenon where a person has extreme anxiety whenever they're doing something -- watching TV or a movie, eating dinner out, hanging out with friends -- that there may be something better they're not doing. It was brought on by the always-on access to social networks like Facebook, where a person is encouraged to constantly update their status.

And update we do! Our "news feeds" on Facebook and other social networks are full of what others in our life are doing. So is it any surprise that all of that apparent activity is causing some of us to be stressed out and anxious?

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My Public Apology to Everyone Hurt by Alcoholics Like Me

I'm deeply ashamed about these things I did.

Just a couple of short weeks ago, I celebrated being clean and sober for 31 years. Yes, it's been a long time, which can make it very easy to dissociate with the addiction-riddled man I was all those years ago.

Don't get me wrong, that's not entirely a bad thing. I don't want to live in the constant memory of who I was then and the things I did in my addicted years. I got sober to save my life, and I stay sober to have a life. My present is very good, so I don't live in the past.

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Responding to Humanitarian Crises

According to World Vision, more than 12 million are affected by the crisis in Syria. That is far more than those affected by Hurricane Katrina, the Haiti earthquake, and the Indian Ocean tsunami combined.

Recent events remind us of a dark time in Europe when other refugees were denied haven and abandoned to fate. Once again, large numbers of people are targets of violence and trauma. After years of suffering, they have left their homes and everything they love and care for because life has become intolerable. They have endured a hellish journey to find safety. And then they have been greeted by faces and hearts of stone.

Thankfully, it seems that voices of compassion are prevailing and refugees are being allowed to proceed to refuge, as international law guarantees civilians fleeing war.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Could Sugar Make Depression Worse?

I have a theory: Many people who suffer from chronic severe depression and anxiety are allergic to sugar and foods like white flour that the human body processes like sugar.

Like most of my theories, I have tested this one on my 13-year-old son, because his brain is most like mine in our family (poor guy). After he has consumed three pumpkin muffins, his character completely changes, like the Green Goblin (Norman Osborn) in "Spider-Man."
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Anxiety and Panic

Affirmations for Reducing Negativity

"Be the change you want to see in the world.” -- Mahatma Gandhi
Do you cringe a little when you hear affirmations? There’s nothing wrong with them, they just seem to be missing substance. You hear a cliche instead of something meaningful.

“You are much more than your opinions of yourself.” I know I’m definitely the kind of person who would roll my eyes at that statement, although I know it's true. It takes a little untangling...
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Anxiety and Panic

Overcoming Fear

We often hear how magic happens outside of our comfort zone. Sometimes, fear can hold us back, paralyzing us from pursuing certain ventures. Overcoming these fears and pushing personal boundaries can have boosting, beneficial effects.

“We’ve come to see stress as a dirty word,” said Carolyn Gregoire in a 2014 article.

In our comfort zone, little stress occurs -- it’s where we feel most at home.
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: September 26, 2015

Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

We hope you're enjoying the budding seasonal changes, and that you'll find something interesting in this week's Psychology Around the Net before heading out to enjoy your Saturday!

This week we've got the latest on mental health parity speculation, ways to boost your confidence, how computers are becoming ridiculously accurate at predicting schizophrenia, and more!

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Brain and Behavior

Surviving Abuse: Rejecting the Scarcity Lie

Survivors of abuse often live a life plagued with scarcity. We were taught at a young age that we weren’t enough, there wasn’t enough and life would not provide enough for us in the future. When we suffer financial abuse or trafficking, things are often worse. We can believe we have a finite worth, we are a commodity, and we have already expended that worth. All these beliefs leave very little hope for an abundant future.

My relationship with money has been a struggle for my entire life. I always made enough to survive when I worked in the corporate world. As I have started working for myself, I have come face-to-face with my monetary dysfunction. The lack of stability, the self-doubt and the intense commitment required make it scary on the good days.

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5 Physical Signs You May Be Depressed

Do these questions sound familiar?

Are you tired or fatigued?
Do you have trouble falling asleep?
Do you have little interest in doing things you once enjoyed?
Do you feel sad, depressed, or hopeless?

They are typical questions asked by a doctor (psychiatrist, general practitioner, gynecologist) or provided in a questionnaire to screen for depression. However, you could be snoozing like a baby, performing at work just fine, and training for a marathon only to have some really bad back pain that won’t go away.
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Can You Treat Depression with an App?

With the proliferation of health tracking apps, it's no surprise to see dozens being offered to help treat people with depressive symptoms. (No app has been FDA-approved or scientifically proven to actually treat depression.)

The New York Times asks four experts and researchers in this area whether you can treat depression with an app in their latest Room for Debate. It's an interesting discussion worth the read.

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Free Webinar: Stop the Chaos! Everyday Management Tips for Moms with ADHD

Join Psych Central host Zoë Kessler for a conversation with Terry Matlen, ACSW. Ms. Matlen is a psychotherapist, consultant, writer, and coach, specializing in women and moms with ADHD. Terry is the author of two books: "The Queen of Distraction” and "Survival Tips for Women with AD/HD" and is the founder of She also runs, an online coaching program for women with ADHD. A nationally-recognized expert and speaker on ADHD, she served for many years on the board of directors of ADDA (Attention Deficit Disorder Association).

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