Addiction

6 Ways to Survive Your Teen’s Eating Disorder

If you have a teen who is struggling with an eating disorder, you know it can be overwhelming, frustrating, lonely, scary, and sometimes feel like a full-time job. Your teen may be reacting angrily one day and the next day melt on the floor in tears.

Eating disorders can disrupt family and work life, create stress in relationships and be a financial hardship. Here are some tips to weather the storm:
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Eating Disorders

How Self-Compassion Builds a More Positive Body Image Than Self-Esteem

"Beauty is perfect in its imperfections, so you just have to go with the imperfections." -- Diane Von Furstenberg
A new study by researchers at the University of Waterloo has touched on a somewhat taboo question: "What if women were to accept themselves with deep self-compassion -- flaws and all?" In other words, what if we looked upon ourselves with kindness, compassion and forgiveness as we would a loved one or a dear friend? Would we gain a more positive body image?

The answer is yes.

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Addiction

Room for Misery & Room for Joy: My Story

Most people who have been sober longer than a year are asked to give a “lead” -- to tell their story. Mine was structurally simple, covering what it was like, what happened, and what it’s like now. Having only drank for three years, my addiction story is pretty straightforward: I stopped guzzling down mood-altering beverages.

My depression story, however, is not.

There are too many circles and uneven ends to fit into any neat, compact narrative. It seems as though the longer you dance with the demon of depression, the more embracing you become of different health philosophies and the more tolerant of unanswered questions.

Is it open-mindedness or desperation?

I don’t know.

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Anorexia

10 Things Parents Wish Educators Knew about Eating Disorders


1. Eating disorders are real and deadly illnesses and having one is not a choice. Your reaction, as an administrator or teacher, to a disclosure of an eating disorder should be the same as if you were told a child had leukemia. Certain eating disorders have a mortality rate as high as 20 percent.

Eating disorders are up to 80 percent genetic, and they are biological in nature. Treatment has to be the number one priority, and the medical and psychological needs of the student should drive how school absences, attendance and other issues are handled.
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Anorexia

Body Image Battles

We indoctrinate our children to the ideals of beauty before they are out of diapers. These images come in the form of dolls such as Barbie and G.I. Joe, providing guidelines of what we are supposed to look like.

These images are only validated and expanded upon as we get older. The media, whether it’s in the form of a magazine or a television, only exacerbates the problem. Researchers have found that negative body image has a major impact on roughly 75 percent of the female university student population.

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Addiction

The Pathological Potential of the Prep Pad

New York Times health columnist Catherine Saint Louis recently covered the many upsides of a spanking new food analyzing device called the Prep Pad. In addition to weighing just how much food you’re about to consume, this unassuming 9-inch-by-6.25 gadget syncs easily with an iPad (generation 3 or higher) to tabulate the grams of carbohydrates, protein, and fat whatever edible hits its scale has to offer -- along with the total number of calories these macronutirients add up to.

Exciting as this may be for well-meaning dieters and family food planners trying their best to be “healthy,” I can (un?)comfortably say I’m already concerned.
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Addiction

The Hunger Fix: Managing Your Addiction to Food

There’s a scene in an episode of “Sex and the City,” where Miranda Hobbes has shamelessly salvaged a cupcake from the trash and, half of the thing in her mouth, leaves a voicemail with Carrie admitting her weak moment in case her friend needs that evidence when she admits her into the Betty Ford clinic. Katie Couric played the clip before introducing her guest, Dr. Pam Peeke, internationally recognized expert, physician, and author in the fields of nutrition, stress, fitness, and public health, on the “Katie” show.

Peeke’s latest book, The Hunger Fix (a New York Times bestseller), lays out the science to prove that fatty, sugary, salty processed foods produce in a food addict’s brain the same chemical reaction as addictions to crack cocaine and alcoholism.

Peeke uses neuroscience to explain how, with repeated exposure coupled with life stresses, any food can become a “false fix” and ensnare you in a vicious cycle of food obsession, overeating, and addiction. The dopamine rushes in the body work the same way with food as with drugs like cocaine.

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3 Common Ways Eating Disorders Develop

Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and overeating develop in people of all shapes and sizes, from all backgrounds and walks of life. Here are three common ways an eating disorder develops:

Low Self-Image or Self-Esteem


It may seem like common sense: Low self-confidence can lead to someone not caring for him- or herself. But the cause of a negative self-image can run much deeper than just body image. On the surface, an eating disorder seems to be all about weight, but the desire to reach a certain size may be a symptom of underlying self-loathing.

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How a Poor Self-Image & Shame Negatively Impacts Your Relationships

Is shame about your body affecting your relationship? Or do you have a child who has an eating disorder and it's affecting your family?

Shame plays a big role in the feelings related to food and it's important to understand the cause in order to treat it. Read on to learn about the feelings and actions that are often involved in the development of eating disorders and what you can do to help your relationships and family cope.

Why? Why does she think that losing weight is more important than anything else, even her health? Why doesn't she see herself as the bright, talented, athletic, attractive young woman that others see? These are among the questions most frequently asked by family members of a young woman with an eating disorder.

A large part of the answer to these questions can be found in understanding the emotion we call shame and its relation to self image.


More from YourTango: Bad Body Image? 15 Ways To Improve Your Self-Esteem


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