Children and Teens

Seasonal Depression & Your Teens, Is It “Just” All in Their Head?

“Tis the season to be Jolly,” right? Well, maybe not so much. Just seeing all the Christmas decorations in the stores before Halloween even arrives can be depressing in and of itself. Think about your own amount of stress when the holidays are approaching. There’s all the parties, gifts that need to be bought, the house that needs to be cleaned, and childcare when the kids are on break. That list for us as parents can go on and on.

On the other hand, think about what might be going on in your the mind of your teenagers. “We never go anywhere for vacation, my family can’t even afford a staycation, much less a vacation. I know I will never get the latest iPhone like my friends. What will Christmas be like this year now that mom and dad are divorced? I’m going to be stuck at the house doing nothing the entire break. It doesn’t seem fair that my cousins always get the good stuff for Christmas…” WOW! I bet their list could be a mile long.
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Depression

Can Life’s Comforts Can Make You More Depressed?

As a late teenager, I went through a bout of depression where I could sleep 24-hours straight, waking up only to use the bathroom. I had a stable circle of friends, was respected in school by peers and teachers and was active in many school organizations and was loved by my family.

Like anyone who experiences depression, the feeling of depression is exhausting and depleting and doesn’t turn off like a light switch. It was a long journey to unravel all the internal pain and like a bad memory, the feeling doesn’t just go away. I’m now in my 30’s and I feel that a lot of my depression stems from comparing my life to others. My ego often gets in the way of my own happiness, but I use small things to remind myself that I have joyous things and experiences in my life to celebrate.
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Depression

Inertia and Self-Care

You’re feeling down. Your energy is lagging. Going out and engaging with the world seems like so much work. Here are some ways you might think about addressing this state of affairs:

Eating an entire carton of ice cream
Going on a Netflix binge
Just going back to sleep

You’ve got to take care of yourself, right? Surely one of these things will revitalize you.
Ha, only kidding! If you’re anything like...
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Depression

5 Self-Care Tips During Recovery from a Suicide Attempt

When the police and paramedics opened the door, they pushed through the lounger, the kitchen and coffee tables, and found my body there, in the hotel room. I was lying on my back, covered in vomit. There was vomit on the bed, on the floor, and it had projected up the wall behind me and covered a massive picture that hung behind the bed. Those who found me thought it was a murder scene. Apparently the pink Benadryl pills, along with the tens of thousands of other milligrams of prescriptions and over-the-counter medications I took, made it look like blood. They thought I was dead and I should have been. I wanted to be. I had been unconscious nearly twelve hours.
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Depression

How You Can Better Love a Partner With Depression

It’s not easy.

Watching someone you love experiencing pain is one of the hardest things in the world, particularly when you can’t do anything about it.

I’ve witnessed couples go through this with terminal diseases before and it’s absolutely heartbreaking. In my own relationship, I’ve lived through a much less severe version of that experience, but that doesn’t mean that the pain hurts any less.

I love a woman who suffers from depression.

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Books

5 Ways to Live Well with Chronic Pain

None of us ever set out to live a life with chronic pain and illness, but it happens. There comes that moment when you are sitting in yet another doctor’s office going over your symptoms for the third time that week, and the physician is simultaneously squinting his eyes, trying to make sense of your laundry list of complaints while scribbling something in your file -- when you realize that your story might not ever have a Cinderella ending.

You panic. You may throw things (when you get home). Niagara Falls begins to erupt from your eyes. And then gradually, over time and much heartache, you embrace Plan B.
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Bipolar

Podcast: My Mental Illness vs. Yours – Whose Is Worse?

The Psych Central Show is our newest offering -- an interesting, in-depth weekly podcast that looks into all things mental health and psychology. Hosted by Gabe Howard and featuring Vincent M. Wales.

Should People Compare Their Mental Illnesses?


In this episode, our hosts discuss how society sees different mental health diagnoses. Gabe Howard has bipolar disorder and Vincent M. Wales has persistent depressive disorder (also known as dysthymia). In addition to each discussing his diagnosis, they compare how the conditions are similar and how are they different, and what each thinks of the other’s diagnosis. Ultimately, they ask the question: Is one worse than the other? And if so, in what ways?

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Depression

Where’s Maslow? A Lifelong Search for Security

Since the late 1980s, I have seen dozens of therapists due to depression and low self-esteem caused by financial distress.

One of these therapists once told me that everyone deserves a certain level of comfort. Whether this is factually accurate has been subject to much debate -- both in philosophy classrooms and in politics.

Regardless, if you do have the intellect to debate this subject, then you have likely had at least one course in basic psychology.

Upon sitting through a semester of Psychology 101, you know of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs -- developed by the American psychologist, Abraham Maslow. In short, this hierarchy addresses human needs -- everything from the need for food and job security to the need for love and self-esteem.
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Depression

10 Common Challenges When Your Spouse Has Depression


It's no walk in the park.

When you're married to someone, you're committed -- through thick and thin, sick and well. But when you're married to someone with depression, sometimes you feel a little sick yourself.

How do you manage to care for your partner yet also find happiness, both within and outside of the marriage? How do you live with a partner who at times may consider suicide or shut off from everyone, including yourself?

It's not easy. And sometimes, it pushes you to the brink of your own sanity. Here are 10 struggles spouses of someone with depression know too well.

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