Antidepressant

This Is Why Taking Antidepressants Makes Me a Better Mother


It wasn't until I had visions of smothering my five-month-old daughter that I knew I needed help.

I've struggled with depression since I was 15 years old, and I've tried to effectively treat that depression for 16 years and counting. I've tried talk therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and light therapy. I've tried changing my diet, changing my job, sleeping more, and drinking less. I've tried prayer, meditation, yoga and running, and I've tried more medications than you can imagine: Wellbutrin, Zoloft, Paxil and even Depakote. And while some things have worked and others haven't, one thing I'm certain of is that antidepressants make me a better person.

Also: I'm a better mom because of medication.
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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Does Crying Make You More Depressed?

“Live to the point of tears,” said Camus.

That’s not so hard if you have treatment-resistant depression or any kind of chronic mood disorder. You learn to take tissues with you wherever you go. In the middle of a depressive episode, especially, crying happens as naturally as sneezing or blowing your nose.

Two or three days of every month are tearful ones for me. Sometimes the crying is triggered by hormonal changes. Sometimes it is a release of stress. And sometimes I don’t really know why I’m crying. I just do.
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: February 6, 2016


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

I hope your February is off to a great start -- I know mine is! Honestly, I don't know what to make of this winter so far -- one weekend I'm snowed in, and the next it's, well, almost spring out there!

Anyway, I've rounded up some interesting little psychology-related nuggets for you to feast on this weekend, whatever your plans, so sit back and get ready to learn about how a parent's depression...
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Depression

How Much Should You Challenge Yourself with Depression?

“When you’re emerging from a depressive episode, how do you know when to push yourself -- in terms of commitments and challenges -- and when to be gentle with yourself?” someone asked recently on my depression community, Project Beyond Blue.

That’s one of the toughest questions facing people who have repeated depressive episodes because, no matter what they choose, they are sure it was the wrong choice. If you don’t take that night course, you feel like you wussed out. But the stress of studying for exams when your cognitive functions are in the toilet doesn’t really get you far either.
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Bipolar

New Zealanders’ Improving Perception of Mental Illness

I am a 63-year-old New Zealander. I’m happily married with two adult sons and two grandsons and work from home in the suburbs of Auckland as a freelance writer. I also suffer from bipolar disorder, which I believe I manage very well. Over the years since I first became ill as a teenager, I have seen huge improvements in the public perception of mental illness, but believe we still have a way to go.

I was about 10 or 11 years old when my father first was admitted to a psychiatric hospital for treatment. I can remember being very confused and asking my teacher if my dad had gone mad. This was back in the '60s when no one really discussed mental illness. If it was talked about, it was in hushed tones. Sufferers were described as being “nervy” or having “bad nerves.”

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Antidepressant

Don’t Mess with Moms Who’ve Suffered Postpartum Depression #meditateonthis

When you claim there's some sort of global conspiracy against a minority population, you probably should have some, you know, actual data to back up your claims.

Unless, of course, you're New York Times best-selling author Marianne Williamson. Then you can just apparently make a claim without any need for science or data, all the while expressing what to me seems like a prejudiced view against people with a mental illness. Namely, moms with postpartum depression.

How did those angry postpartum moms react on Twitter? With one voice.

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Celebrities

Glenn Close Opens Up About Her Depression

When Jessie and Glenn Close founded their mental illness nonprofit, Bring Change 2 Mind in 2010, all of the focus was on Jessie's battle with bipolar disorder. Glenn was there to lend her name and support to the effort, but I'm not sure anyone imagined she too suffered. Silently.

But, according to a new article in Mashable earlier this week, Glenn was first diagnosed with depression in 2008. Which makes her efforts to help launch Bring Change 2 Mind all the more laudable.

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Depression

Making Sense of the 2016 Depression Screening Guidelines

As it did in 2002 and again in 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has once again recommended that primary care physicians and family doctors routinely screen for clinical depression in their patients. Why? Because undiagnosed and untreated depression remains one of the greatest public health problems of modern times.

For the first time ever, the new guidelines also recommend that screenings be conducted during and after pregnancy, as many women are susceptible to postpartum depression. Symptoms of postpartum depression can crop up not only after birth, but also during a mom's pregnancy.

What do these new depression screening guidelines mean for you?

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Depression

How to Get Out of Bed When You’re Depressed

A woman on ProjectBeyondBlue.com, my depression community, recently asked me this: “You exercise daily and eat the right things. You research and write this stuff for a living. But what about those of us who can’t get out of bed in the morning? What about when you are too depressed to exercise, eat right, or work? How do you simply get out of bed?”

The honest answer is that I don’t know.
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Addiction

4 Disorders that May Thrive on Loneliness

Identifying and diagnosing a mental health issue is never an easy process. Most mental health struggles do not take place in isolation, and many of us have negative thought or mood tendencies that, while challenging, do not qualify as a disorder.

As a relationship coach, I’ve found that loneliness is one of the tendencies that often come along with a diagnosed mental health disorder. While correlation is not causation, it seems that loneliness could be more of a cause than a symptom in some of our commonly recognized mental health issues.

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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: January 23, 2016


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

I've been snowed in for the past few days and I have to admit, the extra time to really dive in and reflect gave me a hard time choosing from so many new and interesting psychology-related topics this week!

However, I managed, so now you can dive in and learn more about tackling mental illness stigma with social media, how a father's depression can affect premature birth, why learning how to properly feel emotions...
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