Bipolar Articles

Psychology Around the Net: September 27, 2014

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

Computer Troll

Need caught up on this week’s psychology-related news around the ‘net? From Alanis Morissette’s view on happiness to what NOT to say to someone with bipolar disorder, we’ve got you covered.

Behind the Online Comments: The Psychology of Online Trolls: We’ve all experienced them. Now find out what motivates them.

Most US Kids Who Take ADHD Meds Don’t Get Therapy: Fewer than a quarter of US children prescribed ADHD also receive talk therapy, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics recently reported of the findings from study conducted by the nonprofit research organization RAND.

Tax Court: Anxiety, Depression Are Not Physical Injuries: Ever wonder how the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) views anxiety?

Better is Not Well: Consumer-Clinician Collaboration to Raise Treatment Expectations

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Better is Not Well: Consumer-Clinician Collaboration to Raise Treatment Expectations

Our friends over at the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) will host an interactive panel discussion between peers and clinicians on raising expectations for the treatment of mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder. We invite you to join them for this free, live web-stream broadcast of the event.

The interactive panel is a live event that will be broadcast on the DBSA website on September 25, 2014 at 5:30 pm ET (2:30 PT). Click through to learn more about this free event.

‘I Don’t Want My Friends to Think I’m Crazy’: The Stigma of Bipolar on the College Campus

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Flickr Creative Commons / Massachusetts Office of Travel & TourismMental illness is a prevalent issue on college campuses that often goes unseen and unacknowledged. When I decided I wanted to write an article about students at my university with bipolar disorder, I ran into the difficulty of finding subjects to interview. I asked around my fellow students to see if anyone knew someone who might be willing to speak to me.

“My friend is dating this one crazy girl,” one of my friends jokingly told me. “She’s so bipolar. You should try interviewing her.”

3 Ways to Cultivate Hope

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

P2200022I’m not a mental health professional. I’m a hope builder. I feel like that, more than anything else I do on this earth, is my purpose. Because hope, when you really think about it, is the only thing you need to get better (besides lots of drugs, exercise, fish oil, probiotics, friends, self-help books, doctors, sleep, therapists, nutritionists, support groups, meditation, yoga, divine intervention, etc.). Once you stop believing in a better tomorrow, you’re in trouble.

Psychology Around the Net: August 23, 2014

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014

cant-stop-thinking-of-ex

Overthinking, oversharing, and — well, a few celebrities to boot. That’s what you’ll find in this week’s Psychology Around the Net.

When to Think Less About Your Choices: Thinking too much about something could mean you’re focusing on only a few variables instead of blending a more holistic, emotional view into the situation.

The Psychology of Oversharing Facebook Couples: We all have one or three of these couples within our Facebook feeds. Now find out the psychology behind them.

Pharrell’s ‘Happy’ is a Rare Bright Spot in Track Sales This Year: Admit it: You can’t help but feel a little boost in mood when you hear this song! Well, according to Billboard it’s also bucking the downward trend record sales have seen lately.

Letting Go of Imagined Symbolism in Psychosis

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Letting Go of Imagined Symbolism in PsychosisIn the midst of a psychotic episode, whether the result of bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, one of the main motivating factors in our jilted decisions is the imagined symbolism in meaningless circumstances or objects.

I can remember when I was out on the streets of New York and Boston, deep in the midst of a major psychotic episode. I was convinced I had a mission to bring peace to the world, and though I was destitute, I wandered around following signs and colors and motions of passersby convinced there was some deeper symbolism or meaning in these insignificant things.

Hopeful Lessons from Robin Williams and Kurt Cobain

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Hopeful Lessons from Robin Williams and Kurt CobainI’m old enough to remember Kurt Cobain’s suicide in 1994, and what a major cultural and news event it was.

Although there have been other celebrity deaths in the years since, it’s only now with Robin Williams that a suicide has had as much attention and social magnitude.

The differences over time are striking. Social media has changed the nature of news as well as the conversation about news, and blogs make it easy for anyone to publish online what once might have been op-eds and letters to the editor in paper newspapers and magazines. Retweets and faves on @unsuicide reached an all-time high this week, with more people interested in both learning about and sharing information on suicide prevention. Mashable noticed a powerful and far-reaching positive change in the dialogue about suicide.

Robin Williams, Creativity & Mental Illness

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

Robin Williams, Creativity & Mental Illness

Robin Williams’ suicide this past week has brought forward some commentators who are linking his creative genius to his mental illness. While we can’t say for certain whether his creativity was due, at least in part, to his mental illness, we can say this — there is a lot less of a link between these two things than most people think.

We should remember Robin Williams and attribute his creativity to where it probably best belongs — to a personality, intelligence and insight into the human condition that few people have.

And we should put to rest the myth that in order to be a creative genius, one must also be mentally ill.

Robin Williams, Mental Illness Sufferer, Dead at 63 Due to Suicide

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Robin Williams, Bipolar Sufferer, Dead at 63 Due to Suicide

When a person chooses suicide, it’s hard to accept that choice.

Comedian and award-winning actor Robin Williams apparently made that choice earlier this morning. Robin Williams has long suspected to be a sufferer of either depression or bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is a mental illness where the person fluctuates between episodes of extreme energy, focus and productivity (mania) and severe depression. Apparently, he was in one of the episodes of depression when he took his own life.

We mourn his loss.

5 Practices for Calming Racing Thoughts

Monday, July 28th, 2014

5 Practices for Calming Racing ThoughtsRacing thoughts may be a daily reality for you or an occasional annoyance. Racing thoughts are common for people with anxiety when they’re facing a stressor. They’re also common in bipolar disorder, ADHD and other medical conditions, according to Marla Deibler, PsyD, a clinical psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders.

For instance, anxious thoughts may be a string of worries. Deibler shared this example:

“I don’t have a date for the party tomorrow. I can’t go by myself. What will everyone think? What’s wrong with me? Why don’t I have a date? That’s it. I’m not going. But everyone will wonder where I am. I should go. Oh, I don’t know what to do.”

Racing thoughts can be overwhelming, confusing and distressing, Deibler said. They can hinder your ability to concentrate and accomplish daily tasks. They can hinder your memory and sleep, she added.

Take Charge of Your Health, One Appointment at a Time

Sunday, July 13th, 2014

beverlyhillsmagazine.com“Really, it’s not you. It’s me,” I said to my psychiatrist this morning at an appointment.

I felt as though I were telling a boyfriend that I needed space, that I had been having lunch with another guy and now I was confused about where to go or how to proceed or what I wanted.

Young Adults and Suicide

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Young Adults and SuicideSuicide is a mental health problem affecting the lives of young adults. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cites suicide to be the third leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 and 24. In order to prevent suicide of young adults, families need to talk about it.

Suicide is a choice that can be hard to understand and approach without judgment, and discussing the risk of suicide with young adults may feel uncomfortable. Since young adults tend to bottle up their feelings and avoid expressive conversations, parents may be unaware of the risk of suicide or unsure of how to communicate with their son or daughter regarding mental wellness.

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