ADHD and ADD Articles

5 Reasons Children Might Be Performing Poorly in School

Monday, July 7th, 2014

5 Reasons Children Might Be Performing Poorly in SchoolThere are innumerable reasons why a child might be struggling academically at school. In my practice, this is one of the most common presenting complaints when a parent brings a child for an intake. The most important part of the treatment is often a thorough assessment.

Below are five main reasons which may cause children to perform poorly in school.

ADHD and Kids: 5 Tips for Setting Appropriate Rules

Monday, July 7th, 2014

ADHD and Kids: 5 Tips for Setting Appropriate RulesParenting a child with ADHD can present various challenges because of the disorder’s symptoms, such as hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention.

Kids with ADHD may have every intention of respecting a rule, said Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC, ACC, an educator and parenting coach. But they may break it — often “by accident than on purpose.”

Taylor-Klaus makes a key distinction between “naughty” and “neurological” (having difficulty following a rule because of ADHD symptoms).

Overcoming Common Paralyzing Thoughts for Adults with ADHD

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

medication-adhd-treatmentMany people with ADHD have limiting beliefs that prevent them from achieving their goals, whether it’s going to graduate school or going for a promotion.

For instance, adults might think: “I could never do that, the boring parts would be too hard” or “I’m too lazy and not that smart,” according to Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist and clinical instructor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

12 Ways to Help Kids with ADHD Get Things Done

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

12 Ways to Help Kids with ADHD Get Things DoneKids with ADHD have a hard time completing tasks, such as homework and chores.

They may understand the material and be capable of completing the assignment, said Cindy Goldrich, Ed.M., ACAC, an ADHD parent coach, mental health counselor and teacher trainer. She shares her unique insights and experience to build an environment where kids feel safe, supported, and capable of learning.

But “they often have significant weakness in their ability to get started, stay focused, plan and organize their work, monitor themselves to regulate their actions, and manage their emotions.”

Free Webinar: The Couple’s Guide to Thriving with ADHD

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

thriving-with-adhdJoin Psych Central webinar host Zoë Kessler and special guest Melissa Orlov, award-winning author and marriage consultant, for an enlightening conversation about how to navigate the impact of ADHD in marriage.

Orlov, author of The ADHD Effect on Marriage, will answer your questions and talk about her new book, The Couple’s Guide to Thriving with ADHD, co-authored with Nancie Kohlenberger, LMFT.

This webinar is for adults with ADHD and their partners. If you’re looking for insights into relationships where ADHD is present, and practical strategies and tips on how to save a marriage or relationship in trouble, don’t wait — this is the webinar for you!

Common Mistakes Adults with ADHD Make in Managing the Disorder

Saturday, May 3rd, 2014

Common Mistakes Adults with ADHD Make in Managing the DisorderWhen you’re managing any disorder, you’re bound to make mistakes. (Life is filled with them.)

For instance, making mistakes when managing ADHD symptoms is normal, said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist and clinical instructor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

It’s “part of the journey.”

Also, part of that journey is learning from your errors. Below, ADHD experts share the most common mistakes people with ADHD make when managing their disorder and how to prevent or fix them.

Is Taking Adderall to Boost College Brain Performance Cheating?

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

Is Taking Adderall to Boost College Brain Performance Cheating?A new study that will be presented tomorrow finds that 33 percent of students surveyed for a study at an Ivy League college said they did not think taking an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug, like Adderall or Ritalin, is a form of cheating. Another 25 percent weren’t sure if it was cheating or not, and 41 percent thought it was.

It’s almost as if these college kids need to crack open a dictionary once in a while. Cheating is “to act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage, especially in a game or examination.”

If you’re not taking an ADHD drug for ADHD but rather for its brain-boosting effects, guess what? — that’s cheating.

On Your Own: 5 Tips to Get from Scattered to Focused

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

cant-stop-thinking-of-ex

For those times when you just can’t get going on your To Do list, try these tricks to get moving.

Do you ever wonder if you’re “losing it?” You know what needs to be done — there’s a long To Do list right in front of you. And you find yourself starting a task, getting sidetracked to another item on the list and going back and forth to a few more until you actually complete one!

Scapegoating ADHD — Because It’s Popular

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Scapegoating ADHD -- Because It's Popular

As if people with a mental illness didn’t have enough to worry about.

One of the favorite media topics to write about is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a potentially serious mental illness that affects millions of Americans. It causes them to not be able to focus on everyday tasks that most of us have little trouble with. Many people with ADHD can’t sit still, interrupt others, and can’t wait their turn. Others find any kind of task that requires sustained attention simply impossible.

In the modern world, with so many devices and services competing for our attention, ADHD is at the heart of a perfect storm for those afflicted. While most of us juggle our attempts at multi-tasking seemingly well, those with untreated ADHD have a hard time just getting started.

So it makes me wonder: why are so many journalists quick to pick on ADHD?

7 Tips for Getting Chores Done for Adults with ADHD

Monday, April 21st, 2014

7 Tips for Getting Chores Done for Adults with ADHDAn ADHD brain thrives on interesting tasks. So it’s not surprising that most adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have a hard time getting chores done. Chores such as cleaning, washing dishes, and doing laundry are tedious and boring.

According to Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach, “Broadly speaking, chores are typically left undone, poorly done or often put on the back burner unless there’s a sense of urgency.” That sense of urgency might be guests coming over or not having any clean clothes.

7 Tips to Help Adults with ADHD Stay Organized

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

7 Tips to Help Adults with ADHD Stay OrganizedOften the hardest part of organization for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) isn’t getting organized, it’s staying organized, write Abigail Levrini, Ph.D, and Frances Prevatt, Ph.D, in their book Succeeding with Adult ADHD: Daily Strategies to Help You Achieve Your Goals and Manage Your Life.

Staying organized requires daily, weekly and monthly maintenance. That’s because you’ll naturally amass more paperwork, you’ll get more mail every day, your clothes will get dirty, and you’ll need to put away your groceries, among other things.

Does Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) Exist?

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Does Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) Exist?Sluggish cognitive tempo is a long-time component believed to either be a part of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or may be its own stand-alone concern.

Parts of what we now call sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) has been around since the 1960s, but it was in the late 1980s — long before any attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications existed — when researchers first demonstrated that SCT symptoms are probably a unique condition or sub-type of ADHD (Lahey et al., 1988; Neeper & Lahey, 1986).

In other words, the scientific foundation for sluggish cognitive tempo has been around for nearly 30 years. It’s not new. And it’s hardly news. Scientists regularly identify dozens of proposed syndromes or symptom constellations in their research. Only a tiny minority of them ever go on to become a recognized mental disorder or diagnosis.

But does SCT really exist? Is it its own condition or disorder?

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