ADHD and ADD

How to Prioritize Your Life When You Have ADHD, Part 2

In an earlier piece, we explored how adults with ADHD can identify their priorities. Because often it can seem like everything is equally important and pressing. Your phone is ringing. Constantly. Your inbox is receiving new emails. Every few minutes. You have a meeting you need to prepare for. And there are 10 other things you need to do.

But sometimes this isn’t the issue at all.

Many of Casey Dixon’s clients tell her that they have a problem with “prioritizing,” but really they have a problem with following through. “They know what they need to do and why it’s important [but] they have a hard time doing it.”
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ADHD and ADD

How to Prioritize Your Life When You Have ADHD, Part 1

Prioritizing may seem simple enough. You figure out what you need to do, when you need to do it, and then you do it. But there are actually many steps and processes involved in prioritizing your life. These include everything from paying and shifting attention to planning to getting organized to making decisions to taking action -- all of which also involve multiple steps within each piece. And all these parts and pieces are challenging for people with ADHD because of impairments in executive functioning.

That means that it’s important to have good strategies in place that take those obstacles into account. First, it’s important to identify what’s really troubling you about prioritizing. As ADHD coach Casey Dixon, PCC, BCC, said, are you struggling with knowing your priorities or following through on your priorities? Because these will require very different strategies.
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ADHD and ADD

5 More Strategies to Achieve Meaningful Goals When You Have ADHD

When you have ADHD achieving your goals likely feels daunting. You might have a hard time with everything from planning to completing tasks. Your attention waxes and wanes, you tend to be disorganized and you get bored easily.

You also might have years of experiences in not accomplishing what you want, said Linda Anderson, MA, MCC, a master certified coach who specializes in working with adults with ADHD in business and professional settings. You might have years of criticism -- if you’d only try harder! --stuck in your head, intertwined with your own negative thoughts, she said.
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ADHD and ADD

6 Strategies to Achieve Meaningful Goals When You Have ADHD

You have important goals. You have dreams. You have academic or professional aspirations. You have a certain picture in mind of how you’d like your life to look. Maybe you want to build a meaningful career. Maybe you want to finish your Ph.D. Maybe you want to start your own business. Maybe you want to write a book or change jobs or run a marathon or simply feel better about yourself.

When you have ADHD achieving your goals can be extra challenging, because the symptoms affect every step of the process. ADHD involves impairments in executive functioning, which includes organizing, planning, prioritizing, managing attention and managing time.
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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Parenting: Teaching Your Kids to Regulate Their Emotions

On the outside, when a child with ADHD is having an outburst, it might look like they’re misbehaving on purpose. They’re kicking, screaming, crying and throwing their toys. Or maybe it’s the opposite: They’ve completely shut down.

But there is nothing intentional about these behaviors. Kids don’t want to get angry or act out. “Their brains are actually wired to [over-react],” said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in ADHD.
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ADHD and ADD

Be More Careful with Your Language

I tend to be a little over the top in my criticism of people’s mistaken language and grammar. I am by no means perfect when it comes to these areas, but there are some errors that cause me to want to smack people. (Not in a violent way, but more in a, “I’m taking my glove off and slapping you across the face with it to show you how stupid you are” sort of way.)

One such phrase is, “I could care less.” If you could care less, that means you care some. You should actually be saying, “I couldn’t care less,” because that implies that you have supplied the least amount of caring possible.

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ADHD and ADD

I Am a Special-Needs Parent Raising a Special-Needs Child

My 11-year-old son Sam has anxiety disorder, for which he takes a daily dose of Zoloft. He’s also being treated with Adderall for ADHD. And he was recently diagnosed with autism.

I’m 52 years old and bipolar. I ingest a nightly cocktail of four psychotropic meds.

Because both son and mother have notable disabilities, the going, as they say, can get rough. Thank goodness, Sam's father and my husband, Pete, has both feet planted firmly on the ground and is without mental illness.
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ADHD and ADD

ADHD Isn’t a Disorder of Attention

Many people think of ADHD as a disorder of attention or lack thereof. This is the traditional view of ADHD. But ADHD is much more complex. It involves issues with executive functioning, a set of cognitive skills, which has far-reaching effects.

In his comprehensive and excellent book Mindful Parenting for ADHD: A Guide to Cultivating Calm, Reducing Stress & Helping Children Thrive, developmental behavioral pediatrician Mark Bertin, MD, likens ADHD to an iceberg.

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ADHD and ADD

Should You Be Concerned About ADHD Meds?

A few weeks ago, we published an article that described the sleep problems that children and teens may experience while taking a medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Most people who are diagnosed with ADHD or attention deficit disorder usually wind up on a stimulant medication.

While we know that such medications help most people who take them, like all medications they also come with some unwanted side effects. One of those side effects for stimulants is disruption of a person's sleep.

So how bad a problem is it? And is it something you should consider taking your kid off of these meds?

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ADHD and ADD

7 Practical Tips for Single Moms with ADHD

Single moms with ADHD have a lot of stressors to contend with. Being a single parent is hard enough. But when you have ADHD, as Terry Matlen said, “multiply the stress by a million.” ADHD affects your ability to pay attention, prioritize, plan, organize and recall details, thereby making working and running the household that much tougher. Plus, because ADHD is highly genetic, it’s very likely that one or more of your kids has ADHD, she said.

Matlen’s clients tell her that their biggest concern is that there is no support and they’re constantly on call. “The sense of isolation is huge for these moms.” So is the guilt. They worry that they’re letting down their kids, she said.
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