Alzheimer

Psychology Around the Net: January 21, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

Finally, the weekend is here. That doesn't mean too much to me, however, considering how busy I am with work -- wait. I'm not supposed to say that because...

...today's Psychology Around the Net takes a look at how creativity is born, some not-so-common habits to improve your life, and -- yes -- why saying things like "I'm so busy" might actually be a mindset more than a reality.

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Anger

How to Cope when You Have a Problem with Over Empathizing

Empathy is defined as the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. Nature allots all of us varying degrees of empathy. Those in the helping professions (psychologists, social workers, counselors, etc.) tend to have a higher level of empathy than those in other positions. To that effect, they often find themselves spending an above average amount of time thinking about other people’s issues. So much so that they feel guilty when they can’t come up with a resolution for that person’s problems.
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Anger

How Healing Shame Can Save Our World

Personal growth includes recognizing the many faces of shame and how this hard-to-detect emotion holds us back. The gnawing sense that something is wrong with us keeps us roaming in a trance of unworthiness and self-doubt. A deep sense of being flawed and defective saps our joy and spontaneity.

But have you ever wondered how shame plays out on the larger world stage? Understanding the extent to which political leaders are secretly driven by shame and use shame to steal our vote can shed new light on the hidden ways that this insidious emotion infects today’s political landscape.

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Anxiety and Panic

‘Tis the Season

The joys of the holiday season: the picture-perfect weather, the dazzling holiday displays, and the ugly Christmas sweater parties. Even SantaCon is worth a couple chuckles.

But amidst the holiday cheer, there is a percolating stew of resentment and anger. Past slights, buried deep in our mental recesses, foment in our minds. Family volatility: the gift that keeps on giving.
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Creativity

PODCAST: Why Do Some People View Mental Illness as a Gift?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe and Vincent discuss how some individuals with mental illness view their condition as beneficial, such as giving them enhanced creativity, deeper empathy, more insightful, and so on. They share their own personal stories and anecdotes heard from others. They discuss the reasons behind why some people believe this and why others do not. Ultimately, they offer their own opinions on whether mental illness is more of a giver or a taker.

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Anxiety and Panic

When Worrying Takes Over

There are many worriers out there: The man who constantly worries about whether he has or will get cancer or another terrible disease. The woman who lies awake at night, fearing that she will never meet the right one. The grandmother who can’t let go of the idea that the plane with her grandchildren on board might crash. The employee who can’t concentrate because he fears he may have made a mistake that will cost him his job.

They are all different, but worriers also have a lot in common: Unconsciously, they see worrying as a useful strategy to get prepared and gain control.
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Anxiety and Panic

Productive Fidgets: 8 Ways to Deal with Anxiety and Depression

As a person with active and severe mental illness, for six months I worked with a service animal. When I weaned off of his care, I transitioned to things that would keep my hands busy, things that would keep me from absentmindedly scratching myself or picking at my skin. I tried things like Play0Doh, modeling wax, and rubbing stones, but none could engage my brain enough to keep me on track. I eventually found the missing link: they were not productive.

Once I had isolated this critical thread, I was able to pack myself a small bag of “productive fidgets” that I could carry around in a manner that is *relatively* socially innocuous while mitigating the symptoms of my anxiety and depression.
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