Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: January 23, 2016


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

I've been snowed in for the past few days and I have to admit, the extra time to really dive in and reflect gave me a hard time choosing from so many new and interesting psychology-related topics this week!

However, I managed, so now you can dive in and learn more about tackling mental illness stigma with social media, how a father's depression can affect premature birth, why learning how to properly feel emotions...
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Children and Teens

The Fear of Having Children When You Grew Up in an Abusive Home

I’ve often wondered what kind of mother I would be. I thought I’d be a terrible parent, unable to make any decisions on my own. I thought I needed someone watching my every move or I’d screw up royally. Then I’ve swung the other way and thought I’d be the greatest mother in the world. And among all that ambivalence, I wonder if I’ll ever be a mother at all.

I grew up in an abusive home where bad behavior and poor coping skills were modeled daily. I spent much of my adult life trying to unlearn those unhealthy ways of dealing with my emotions and with the world.
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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Parenting: Teaching Your Kids to Regulate Their Emotions

On the outside, when a child with ADHD is having an outburst, it might look like they’re misbehaving on purpose. They’re kicking, screaming, crying and throwing their toys. Or maybe it’s the opposite: They’ve completely shut down.

But there is nothing intentional about these behaviors. Kids don’t want to get angry or act out. “Their brains are actually wired to [over-react],” said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in ADHD.
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Children and Teens

5 Helpful Tips to Help Children Manage Stress


Being a kid these days is intense. Here's how to help your child cope with the pressure.

You know how awful stress makes you feel. But seeing stress on your child’s face or hearing it in his or her voice? That feels even worse!

You recognize these feelings oh so well -- overwhelm, anxiety, exhaustion, restlessness, irritability, and a mind racing with less-than-helpful thoughts. It doesn’t matter how big, small, or "real" you think the threat is, to your child some challenges of childhood (and young adulthood) seem larger or stronger than he or she can handle.

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Brain and Behavior

What is Affluenza? Is it Real?

Affluenza is a term describing a "metaphorical illness" whereby children or teens who grow up in a privileged lifestyle, largely isolated emotionally and developmentally from their working parents, feel excessive pressure to achieve in both academic and extracurricular activities. This can make children feel more isolated than their friends, while at the same time feeling an increase in pressure to perform. The result? Greater depression, anxiety and substance or alcohol abuse compared to their friends.

Researchers don't generally refer to this as affluenza, but rather as problems growing up in a culture of affluence. There is no official diagnosis of "affluenza," and research into this phenomenon is fairly scarce.

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Caregivers

The Effects of Overparenting on Children

The term helicopter parenting was coined in 1969 by Dr. Haim Ginott, psychotherapist and parent educator, in his book “Between Parent and Teenager.” A helicopter parent is defined as someone who is overprotective or overly interested in their child’s life. Several examples of this include telling a child how to play correctly, brushing a child’s teeth for him when he is a healthy 12-year-old, completing a child’s science project for her, cutting meat at the dinner table for a 16-year-old boy, or talking to a college professor about an adult child's grades.

Being an involved parent is not a bad thing. Being active in a child’s life can increase the child's confidence, build a closer bond between parent and child, and increase chances of the child being a successful adult. But where is the line that divides the actively involved parent and the overly involved parent?

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Addiction

Nomophobia & Smartphone Addiction Among Children

The term “addiction” is usually associated with alcoholism and drug abuse. Yet people do get addicted to different stimulants that are quite legal substances.

Smartphones changed our primary concept of a cell phone. It is no longer used strictly to establish audio communication. Smartphones allow us to have our camera, GPS navigator, video game terminal, and even our own library in hand. Nevertheless, the biggest and most important aspect is that a smartphone gives us access to the Internet.

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ADHD and ADD

I Am a Special-Needs Parent Raising a Special-Needs Child

My 11-year-old son Sam has anxiety disorder, for which he takes a daily dose of Zoloft. He’s also being treated with Adderall for ADHD. And he was recently diagnosed with autism.

I’m 52 years old and bipolar. I ingest a nightly cocktail of four psychotropic meds.

Because both son and mother have notable disabilities, the going, as they say, can get rough. Thank goodness, Sam's father and my husband, Pete, has both feet planted firmly on the ground and is without mental illness.
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Children and Teens

The Psychology of Smartphones and Texting

Our communication habits are changing faster than in any other period throughout history. More than 80 percent of American 18- to 34-year-olds prefer nonverbal communication mediums in daily life. We are witnessing not only the demise of the landline phone, but possibly also the end of the phone call itself. In my new book Texting in Sick: How Smartphones, Texting, and Social Media are Changing Our Relationships, I’m documenting the factors behind these massive changes as well as their social implications.

Most people are probably unaware that text messaging, when it was first conceived, was not intended for person-to-person use. When SMS saw the light of day back in 1993, its original purpose was to allow operators to send concise service updates to their subscribers. However, as it often happens with technology, unique social uses emerge when in the hands of users. That became true for SMS as well.
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