Bullying

The Mental Health Impact of Racism on Students

Since the presidential election, American primary and secondary schools have seen a
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Children and Teens

Steps to Successful Co-Parenting

Being a parent is a huge responsibility and often times one that is shared with a co-parent. A co-parent is the person (or people) who helps to raise your child in one way or another. This could be your spouse, an ex, your ex’s spouse, or even a friend or family member.  

In my experience as a clinician for children and adolescents, having adults that are able to co-parent in a respectful, collaborative, and accepting way is one of the most important factors in my clients’ ability to access his or her treatment.
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Brain and Behavior

Psychology Around the Net: December 10, 2016


My neck of the woods had its first snow yesterday! It wasn't anything major -- just some steady flurries, really -- but it lasted several hours and made me happy. I love the first snow of the season; it's just...magical to me. It always puts me in a good mood.

According to the forecast, it won't snow any this weekend, but at least I got to enjoy it yesterday.

Anyway, off to this week's mental health news! Get ready for how the 21st Century Cures Act will affect mental health care, a list of essential habits to help boost your everyday life, how training teachers in mental health could help students, and more.

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Bullying

Emotional Abuse in Children

Much of the work on emotional abuse has been written about adult relationships, yet children, pre-teens and teens have their own unique needs in these very important formative years. There are certain experiences, such as secure attachment, that need to be met in order for children to grow and thrive. Unfortunately, they do not always have that safe place in their own home.
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Caregivers

How to Stop Apologizing for Everything You Do

Do either of these situations sound familiar?

You start an email to your boss with, “I’m sorry to bother you, but…”


A colleague plops his papers down on the conference table, knocking your coffee over. “Sorry! Let me get this stuff out of your way,” you say as you begin cleaning up.

Maybe you’ve fallen into this over-apologizing trap or have found yourself saying “I’m sorry” for things that don’t merit an apology in the first place.
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Children and Teens

Seasonal Depression & Your Teens, Is It “Just” All in Their Head?

“Tis the season to be Jolly,” right? Well, maybe not so much. Just seeing all the Christmas decorations in the stores before Halloween even arrives can be depressing in and of itself. Think about your own amount of stress when the holidays are approaching. There’s all the parties, gifts that need to be bought, the house that needs to be cleaned, and childcare when the kids are on break. That list for us as parents can go on and on.

On the other hand, think about what might be going on in your the mind of your teenagers. “We never go anywhere for vacation, my family can’t even afford a staycation, much less a vacation. I know I will never get the latest iPhone like my friends. What will Christmas be like this year now that mom and dad are divorced? I’m going to be stuck at the house doing nothing the entire break. It doesn’t seem fair that my cousins always get the good stuff for Christmas…” WOW! I bet their list could be a mile long.
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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Psychology Around the Net: November 12, 2016


I won't begin this edition of Psychology Around the Net by saying "Happy Saturday!", as I usually do, because I -- like the rest of the country, and the world -- am well aware that many of you are not happy.

Whether you voted for Hillary Clinton and are outraged that -- and perhaps feeling scared and threatened because -- Donald Trump won the election, or you voted for Donald Trump (or a third-party candidate) and are hurt because some of your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and even strangers are accusing you of not caring about important human concerns such as racism, sexism, and the safety of the LBGTQ community, chances are you're not happy.

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Children and Teens

How Does Birth Order Affect a Child?

Does being a firstborn, middle child, last-born or only child have an effect on your personality, behavior, or even your intelligence? While the possibility has been challenged, our birth order is believed by many to have an enduring impact on our psychological development and adult relationships.

Firstborns are often described as being high achievers who seek approval. They’re also described as cautious, controlling, and reliable. Firstborns and only children are the only siblings who are allowed to bask in their parents’ undivided attention (for better or worse) with no distractions from siblings. Studies have confirmed that without question, firstborn children are offered more individual and uninterrupted hours of their parents’ attention, which may, in fact, allow for relatively greater gains in intelligence.
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Children and Teens

How Can Childhood Emotional Neglect Make You a Stronger Adult?


All it takes is growing up in a household where your feelings don't matter enough.

With their heads held high but their spirits lower than should be, they walk among us.

"I don't need any help," they say with a smile. But "what do you need?" they ask others with genuine interest.

Loved and respected by all who know them, they struggle to love and respect themselves. These are the people of Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN).

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Bullying

Why Are We Still Labeling Children as ‘Emotionally Disturbed’?

I'm not perfect at my job, but I know my presence makes a world of difference

I proudly landed my first school counseling job at a public school in New York City. I had been warned by fellow counselors we can never be fully prepared to take on the enormity of our role.

I admit to feeling intimidated upon hearing the label given to children of whom I would be working. The term, "emotionally disturbed (ED)" also intrigued me, but painted a picture before I even met a single child on my caseload. Not learning specific special education classifications in graduate school, I read up as much as I could about this identification. The image my mind had created included children appearing older than their natural age, possessing negativity and a toughness about them; similarly, to the many Hollywood movies about inner city kids, and contrary to the children whom I grew up with in suburban schools. And then I arrived to work on my first day, wide-eyed and with a tough exterior of my own that I anticipated I would need.
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Addiction

Why Do Drugs?

Any casual look at media, billboards, online popups, and banners and signs in stores is enough to show that medications and drugs are ubiquitous. Whether used initially for a legitimate medical reason - with a prescription from a doctor - or socially, drug use can and does morph into something much more serious, including addiction. Why, then, do drugs?

Just as there are many reasons people drink alcohol, there are equally as many why they do drugs. Here are some of the more common:

To feel euphoria, pleasure and empathy, even though temporary
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