Aging

Have You Lost the Pep in Your Step?

There are times in your life when you will feel like you’ve had enough! You work too hard; you worry too much; you no longer have pep in your step. You yearn for the kid you used to be who knew how to have fun, who loved to run around, who laughed easily.

It’s been awhile since you began to view life as a never-ending burden, requiring you to put one foot in front of the other to get going. Inside you, there’s a meanness and a madness. It feels awful. Those feelings are invisible to most people because you can still paste a smile on your face.
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Aging

Using Social Media to Glimpse Our Past Selves

It’s the summer of 2005. My friend and I are lounging at a public pool during one of those sweltering July afternoons. Before we immerse ourselves in the water, feeling the coolness of chlorine on our skin, we decide to dedicate a decent amount of time to snapping photos of each other for MySpace.

We were 15. This was the first major social networking site within our reach, and we were hooked.
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Aging

Growing Up: Playfully Serious vs. Seriously Playful

My father liked to teach his sons basic skills, like how to use a saw, tighten a nut, and catch a baseball. In one of my earliest memories of him we are on a beach and he is teaching me how to skip stones across the water. First, choose the right stone: not too heavy and not too light, flat enough and having an edge so you can spin it off your finger. You also have to bend over and throw it at just the right angle.

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Aging

Remembering ‘Parenthood’

The TV show "Parenthood" recently ended after six seasons and viewers bid goodbye to the Braverman family. From the very first episode to the last, the NBC show's story lines were undeniably emotional, poignant and moving.

The Bravermans authentically capture human experience, bringing the narratives and characters to life.

Here are some of the pertinent themes (my personal favorites) that this wonderful series covered during its run.

Raising a child with Asperger's.

In season one, Adam and Kristina...
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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: February 14, 2015


Happy Valentine's Day, Psych Central readers!

For those of you who observe Valentine's Day, we have some interesting information about why single people actually might benefit more than those in relationships.

Oh, and there're are a few more fascinating reads -- from taking a peek at some useful mental health apps to learning how successful people deal with depression.

We hope it provides a great start to your weekend!

It's Better to Be Single On Valentine's Day: Here's one that's sure to drum up some controversy: Philosopher Neil McArthur and author Marina Adshade make several arguments about why it's actually better to be single on this day of celebrating love, going beyond just the economic implications and diving into the "are you or are you not committed to me" realm.

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Aging

10 Common Reactions to Urinary Incontinence that Impede Care-Seeking

Our lives are a dynamic flurry of family and professional activities -- our work, our families and friends, and duties on the home front. Some of us have additional challenges due to ill health, financial stress, elder care or marital breakdown. When small urine leaks begin to appear every now and then, they might feel like a nuisance amid the noise of everyday life. Research tells us that women wait about five to 10 years to seek assistance for urinary incontinence.

Our beliefs about the problem are important because they influence how and when we take action. The following are 10 common reactions that deter or delay sufferers, especially women, from seeking professional advice or assistance for the problem:

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Aging

Do Comfort and Adventure Have to Be Mutually Exclusive?


"Which do you prefer, adventure or comfort?" I was asked recently, matter-of-factly, as if the two were mutually separate entities, and I, given the option to choose only one.

I closed my eyes and I wondered. Now, at the age of 53, I see clearly that my answer is remarkably different than the answer I would have certainly given in my 20s.

"I am seeking comfort," I shot out too quickly, "…and adventure," I added, clearly coming across as someone who has trouble making decisions.

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Aging

Study: Reversing Alzheimer’s Memory Decline With Holistic Therapy


A new UCLA study has found that when individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) switched to a healthy diet and exercise program, their memory and cognitive function began to return in a dramatic way. In fact, six out of the 10 patients who had been struggling in their jobs, or had even quit due to cognitive dysfunction, were able to return to work.

The results are both fascinating and hopeful for the millions of people suffering with AD and for those who have yet to develop symptoms.

Alzheimer’s is now the third leading cause of death in the U.S., after cardiovascular disease and cancer. Currently, there is no cure for AD, and medications only temporarily lessen symptoms.

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Aging

Love Knows No Age! 5 Dating Tips for the 40 and Older Crowd


Want to know where all the decent single men are hiding? Believe it or not, they are everywhere.

I have some news that will both surprise and delight you. Want to know where all the quality single men are? They are everywhere.

There are about 45 million single men over the age of 35 in the United States and about 8 million are over 65 years old. There are about 7 million single men in Britain and 2 million in Australia, and those are just the ones using online dating.

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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: October 11, 2014


Find tips on creating a loving relationship, information about how your happiness affects your decision-making process, and more in this week's Psychology Around the Net.

5 Tips to Create a Loving Relationship With Fewer Disappointments: Having trouble in the love department, or just want to improve your current relationship? Check out these five tips for focusing on yourself and finding "wholeness," letting go of expectations, listening to understand rather than to react, and more.

Depression Increases Risk of Falls in Elderly: Recent research from Neuroscience Research Australia suggests the risk of falls among the elderly increases when depressive symptoms are present.

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Aging

Abuse of Vulnerable Adults: Why Does it Happen?

Researchers believe that society is more willing to report, talk about and act on allegations of the abuse of vulnerable adults. Over the last two years, the number of reports of abuse has risen by almost two percent, according to statistics from the Health and Social Care Information Centre in Leeds, England.

Although it is impossible to determine whether this marks a real increase in adult abuse, or simply an increase in reporting, there are reasons to suggest that the latter may be more likely.
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