Aging Articles

25 Things I Learned the Year I Turned 25

Friday, December 13th, 2013

25 Things I Learned the Year I Turned 25With 2014 looming around the corner, I decided to reflect upon the past year and what I’ve learned.

Turning 25 was a big one for me, and with it came a lot of personal growth and learning experiences. I would like to share them with you and I encourage you to do the same. It allows you to pause and note any changes, progress, setbacks, and lessons you’ve experienced so far.

So here it goes — 25 things I learned the year I turned 25.

Birthdays & Age Expectations of Today’s Young Adult

Sunday, November 17th, 2013

Birthdays & Age Expectations of Today's Young Adult“Your age is your age. But more importantly, your life is your life. Enjoy where you are. Here. Right here.”
~ Today Was Meaningful Blog

My birthday recently passed, and I jokingly announced to everyone that I’m turning the same age again. (Look at me guys, I’m forever young — literally!) I think it’s safe to presume that many of my 20-something friends are also a bit reticent that we’re another year older. It’s not that we don’t know this obvious fact of life, but it still somehow hits us hard that time seems to fly incredibly fast.

But perhaps aging is just a small part of our moaning and groaning. Societal expectations — age expectations — could be what have us sighing. It’s as if we’re all on a timeline to achieve this by this age, and be in this place by that age, and on and on the cycle continues.

The Seniors Are Coming: World Mental Health Day 2013

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

The Seniors Are Coming: World Mental Health Day 2013America — like the rest of the world — is facing a fundamental shift in its population from younger to older in the next few decades. Due to great leaps in technology and health, people are simply living longer.

Some places aren’t well-prepared for this shift. Nowhere is that more true than in the U.S.

In America, I’m ashamed to acknowledge we too-often treat seniors like people whose contributions to society have ended. They have nothing left to share, and so are shuffled off to a nursing home.

How does that make the elderly feel? Let’s just say that it’s not real good for their mental health.

Dear Diary: Who Am I?

Sunday, August 11th, 2013

Dear Diary: Who Am I?“What do you wish you could tell your 13-year-old self?”

This is a common parlor-game sort of question, leading to warm and fuzzy discussions about how difficult adolescence is and how we wouldn’t want to be teenagers again. Pink has even turned it into a song, “Conversations With My Thirteen Year Old Self.”

But in a twist on that, I am finding that my 13-year-old self has some things to tell me.

7th Canadian Conference on Dementia

Sunday, July 28th, 2013

7th Canadian Conference on DementiaDementia, a term used to describe declines in mental ability, such as memory and thinking, that interfere with daily life, affects millions of people in the U.S. and Canada. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are just two of the debilitating diseases encompassed by the term dementia.

From October 3-5, 2013, a world-renowned faculty of national and international speakers will gather at the 7th Canadian Conference on Dementia in Vancouver, British Columbia.

The conference offers a wide range of topics related to dementia. There will be opportunities for stimulating debate, interactive workshops and exposure to the latest research via oral and poster presentations.

Depression & Seniors: 5 Ways You Can Help

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Depression & Seniors: 5 Ways You Can HelpDepression affects people of all ages; it really doesn’t care if you’re a 17-year-old high school student or a 50-something CEO.  Depression is non-discriminating  and will take you down like a starving grizzly bear, given half a chance.

There is one age group that often gets overlooked when it comes to depression and that’s the elderly.

In seniors especially, symptoms of depression are sometimes missed or confused with the effects of other illnesses or medication they may be using. Also, the typical symptoms of depression — such as fatigue, lack of appetite and loss of interest in previously loved activities — are often put down to the aging process and not depression. Studies on the number of elderly people experiencing depression varies, but it’s estimated 6.5 million of Americans over 65 are depressed.

Sadly, only about 10 percent of those people actually receive any help.

Memento Mori: Remember You’re Mortal

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Memento Mori: Remember You're MortalI love the story about how, when generals were parading through the streets of Rome during a victory march, a slave would be tasked with walking behind them saying memento mori — remember you’re mortal.

How great is that? Here’s a Roman general, top of the pile, a massive celebrity (like the Jay-Z of his day), and there’s this slave reminding him that he’s mortal and not to get too high above himself because he too can die.

Personally, I think we need more of that today — humility and the awareness to realize and accept that we are mortal, destined to die.

8 Ways to Help Your Aging Parents

Saturday, April 20th, 2013

8 Ways to Help Your Aging ParentsAs they age, our parents might need more help. But you might not know exactly how to lend a hand or even where to start. Plus, what do you do if your parents balk at your attempts to assist them?

While every situation is unique, Christina Steinorth, MFT, a psychotherapist and author of Cue Cards for Life: Thoughtful Tips for Better Relationships, offered her suggestions for helping aging parents.

1. Empathize with your parents.

Sometimes you might be taken aback by your parents’ frustration, moody behavior or neediness. In fact, on some days, they might be downright unpleasant to be around. But it’s important to be empathetic and understand where they’re coming from. According to Steinorth, “Aging is a series of losses — loss of employment, health and energy, friends, mobility, and independence.” Consider how you’d feel if you were in their situation, she said.

Botox as a Cure for Depression

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Botox as a Cure for DepressionWashington-based dermatologist Dr. Eric Finzi has released what The New York Times has praised as “the first authorized biography” of Botox, a book investigating how a traditionally cosmetic treatment could be actually be a depression cure.

In The Face of Emotion, Finzi suggests that up to half of all wrinkle-busting procedures can dramatically improve moods, as well as our relationships with others.

And I absolutely agree with his theory — I’ve been researching this link myself since 2008.

Botox is a cosmetic dermatology practice, where Botulinum Toxin A (Botox is just one brand of this) is injected into frown muscles. This paralyzes them for up to six months. Patients can expect to see smoother, less-lined foreheads, with wrinkles seemingly disappearing to reveal a more youthful look.

Frown muscles are responsible for lines, but are also important in expressing normally negative emotions such as sadness, fear, anger and distress. A Botoxed patient can’t physically form the expressions necessary to portray these emotions; the procedure renders it impossible.

Who Are These People Who Raised You?

Friday, March 8th, 2013

Who Are These People Who Raised You?Though much has been written about how to deal with parents who are slowing down physically and mentally, I’ve read nothing about how to deal with parents who have become wiser and kinder.

It may seem like there’s no problem if your parents have become better people. Just count your blessings and get on with life! But it’s not always that simple.

Mike grumbles, “I can’t believe my father wants to be so involved with my kids. When I was growing up, he barely gave me the time of day. “Shut up! Do your homework! Listen to your mother!” That was pretty much the extent of our relationship. And now, he wants to take my son to school, coach his games, take him on a trip. Who is this new person? And how come I got the short end of the stick?”

Kim gripes, “My mother was always on my case. I had to dress right, speak right, eat right and live right. Otherwise, what would people think? Now, when I berate my daughter for not acting properly, my mother comes to her defense, telling me that I’m too hard on her. It makes me furious. She was 10 times harder on me than I am on my daughter. What’s going on here?”

The Psychology of Flossing

Monday, February 25th, 2013

The Psychology of FlossingWhy is it so tough to remember to floss?

I rarely run into patients who can’t remember to brush their teeth twice a day, but even the most conscientious among us come to their hygiene appointment anxious and awaiting the hygienist’s lecture about flossing.

Flossing can be icky and awkward — no one likes feeling like they’re shoving their entire fist into their mouth. But the reason why we don’t make flossing a habit is a bit more complicated and has its roots in psychology.

During the early 1900s, right around World War I, dental hygiene was so bad, it was said to be a national security risk. Why? People weren’t brushing their teeth, of course, and the 1900s marks the period when Americans first began to consume sugary, ready-to-eat processed foods, such as crackers, breads, and potato chips.

Pollution and Well-Being: A Startling Connection

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

Pollution and Well-Being: A Startling ConnectionPollution can be ugly.  Just think of an industrial chimney spewing smog into the air.  It has devastating effects on the environment, plants and wildlife.  And we know that pollution has a negative effect on our physical health.  Since the 1970s, a recent article in Monitor on Psychology reports, we’ve studied the harmful impact of pollution on our cardiovascular and respiratory health.

A growing body of evidence indicates that the impact of pollution goes beyond physical health.  According to the Monitor, researchers have found that high levels of air pollution may damage children’s cognitive abilities, increase adult risk of cognitive decline and may even contribute to depression.

The issue is not as visible or taken as seriously as it should be, according to Paul Mohai, PhD, a professor in the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources.

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