Lived Experience Coping Tips for Suicidal Thoughts

For the last couple of years I've been asking people on Twitter, "What's your favourite way to cope with suicidal thoughts?"

Answers were then retweeted, and favourited by my account @unsuicide.

They range from physical activity -- cycling, walking, yoga -- to cognitive exercises and reframing that helps with perspective when confronted by suicidal thoughts. Sleep, art, music, and writing were all mentioned more than once. And one popular method of coping was pets.

Now I've collected those tweets onto one web page, Lived Experience Coping Tips.

It includes adorable photos of supportive cats.
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How Adults with ADHD Can Become Better Listeners

Because adults with attentive deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are easily distracted by their environment and their own thoughts and feelings, listening to others is a challenge, according to Beth Main, a certified ADHD coach.

It's a challenge in all kinds of settings, from one-on-one conversations to classroom lectures to work meetings.

After all, “Inability to sustain attention is one of the hallmark symptoms of ADHD.”
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Brain and Behavior

The Usefulness of Collaborative Care

Many patients with mental health issues go to their primary care doctor either because they assume their symptoms are medical or simply because it is their only doctor. However, primary care doctors are not trained in mental healthcare and do not have the necessary time to address mental health concerns.

How would you feel if a mental health professional came to chat with you while you were sitting in the doctor’s office? Would it remove some of the stigma of calling a shrink? After all, you didn't seek out this mental health professional. You did not even have to make an appointment to see them.

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4 Proven Ways to Overcome Adversity

Does it seem like every challenge that you experience becomes a big headache in your life?

No matter what adverse events you are currently experiencing, there is a purpose behind each one. For most of us, it’s difficult to imagine that losing a child or finding out that you have cancer is a blessing. I know from personal experience.

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Signs Your Boundaries Are Too Loose or Too Rigid

Many of us might not realize it, but the boundaries we currently have may be too restrictive or too permissive. Since boundaries are our rules for relationships and really how we live our lives, it’s important to make sure we’re maintaining healthy limits -- which both protect us and permit intimacy.

Psychotherapist Joyce Marter, LCPC, described healthy boundaries as the “midway between Diva and Doormat.”

The Diva is grandiose and entitled, while the Doormat is passive and has low self-esteem. The Diva doesn’t respect others’ boundaries, while the Doormat doesn’t respect her own, she said.

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Is Low Self-Esteem Making You Vulnerable to Depression?

Low self-esteem makes us feel bad about ourselves. But did you know that over time it also can cause the development of serious mental conditions such as depression?

Low self-esteem is an important indicator used by clinicians as one possible symptom when they diagnose a depressive disorder. But did the low self-esteem cause the depression or vice versa? Researchers have long wondered about the chicken-and-egg problem of self-esteem and depression. Certainly, if you dislike yourself, you’ll be more likely to be depressed. Conversely, if you’re depressed, you’ll be more likely to feel bad about who you are as a person.

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Dancing in the Rain: Learning to Live With Treatment-Resistant Depression & Chronic Pain

“Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass … it’s about learning to dance in the rain,” wrote Vivian Greene. Dancing in the rain is the modus operandi of folks living with chronic pain. They spend a lifetime figuring out how to dance gracefully -- with little effort visible to the observer -- and to resist the urge to sit down and close their eyes until the sun comes back out.

Living with treatment-resistant depression, the kind of melancholy that hangs around for years or decades or sometimes a lifetime, requires the same skills. We don’t often categorize it as such, but treatment-resistant depression is a type of chronic illness, sometimes involving disabling pain on a daily basis.

Like most people with compromised health, I have concentrated my energy for the last 40 years on how to get rid of the pain, how to get to a better spot where I will be able to live more freely and won’t have to spend so many hours with my nose to a self-help book or scribbling symptoms in my mood journal, recording the day’s number, between a serene 0 and a suicidal 5.
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Narcissism and Millennials in the Digital Age

According to, narcissism is defined as “an inordinate fascination with oneself; excessive self-love; vanity; self-centeredness, smugness, egocentrism.”

As a 20-something myself, I observe how individuals frequently throw this infamous word around, specifically referencing Generation Y, otherwise known as Millennials: “Look at how they tweet and talk about themselves -- such a narcissistic generation!”

And while indulging in Twitter/Facebook updates and Instagram photos could be superfluous, I find that it’s a reflection of the digital age. Social media outlets have now become another prominent platform for communication and instant disclosure.
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Why No One is Talking About the Possible Overdiagnosis of Autism

With the latest CDC figures out, it appears autism is now appearing in about 1 in 68 children in the United States. The disorder -- now officially known as autism spectrum disorder -- is being diagnosed at a rate that represents a 30 percent increase from 1 in 88 two years ago.

What's amazing to me is that I couldn't find a single media report that floated the idea that this increase represents an overdiagnosis of the disorder. While "overdiagnosis" seems to be the first thing suggested when the topic is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder's (ADHD) huge jump in diagnoses over the past two decades, it's not mentioned in any description of autism's increase.

Why the double-standard?

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Best of Our Blogs

Best of Our Blogs: March 28, 2014

I had a reoccurring nightmare again last night. Although it was a different dream, it held the same anxious theme. This time instead of failing a test or a class, I was failing a job. It happens too often to mention. Instead of the whimsical, carefree dreams of my youth, I find myself working hard and stressing out even while sleeping.

Weeks ago I attended Wanderlust, a yoga retreat happening in Hawaii. One of the teachers was surfing legend Gerry Lopez. He said we're in fight and flight mode even while sleeping. Stress used to be a response to traumatic occurrences. Now we're stressed out on a daily basis. Being able to relax has become a gigantic hurdle.

I think it's why stress is always a popular topic. We might grapple with different issues. Your biggest problem might be your kids. Her number one difficulty is friendships. He struggles with his family. But stress? It's something we all can relate to.

To end our week, you'll learn how to cope with stress more effectively and learn what personality disorder(s) or family relationships may be responsible for the stress you're currently experiencing.
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