8 Medications that You Didn't Know May Contribute to DepressionAwhile back, a review in the journal “Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience” highlighted certain medications that may contribute to depression.

These medications may cause depression by altering levels of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Or they can trigger depression indirectly, by causing fatigue, diminished appetite, sedation, or other side effects, leading to subsequent frustration, demoralization, or a full depressive episode.

So what’s on the list?

It can be difficult to determine whether a medication has caused depression in any given patient because depression is substantially more common in patients with medical illness than it is in the general population.

The following medications should be used cautiously in people with current or prior depression, or those who are otherwise at high risk for depression:

  • Barbiturates
  • Vigabatrin (Sabril)
  • Topiramate (Topamax)
  • Flunarizine
  • Corticosteroids
  • Mefloquine
  • Efavirenz (Sustiva)
  • Inteferon-alpha

The review also covered drugs that may cause depression — the evidence was not as strong as the prior list. The medications are prescribed to treat illnesses that are associated with an increased risk of depression, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and epilepsy. Classes of medications that may contribute to depression include:

  • Alzheimer’s disease drugs such as donepezil (Aricept) and rivastigmine (Exelon)
  • Anti-androgens such as bicalutamide (Casodex) and nilutamide (Nilandron)
  • Anti-convulsants such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), lamotrigine (Lamictal) and zonisamide (Zonegran)
  • Benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), estazolam (ProSom), and lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), propranolol (Inderal), and timolol (Timoptic)
  • Calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor and others) and verapamil (Canal)
  • Hormone replacement therapies such as estrogen (Cenestin, Enjuvia, and others), medroxyprogesterone (Provera) and conjugated estrogens/medroxyprogesterone (Prempro)
  • Parkinson’s disease medications such as amantadine and levodopa/carbidopa (Parcopa, Sinemet)

Medication-related depression is a greater risk for people with a history of mood disorders and for people who are taking multiple medications.

Originally published on Sanity Break at EverydayHealth.com

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 19 Mar 2014
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Borchard, T. (2014). 8 Medications that You Didn’t Know May Contribute to Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/01/06/8-medications-that-you-didnt-know-may-contribute-to-depression/

 

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