Developing Psychological Flexibility with Acceptance & Commitment TherapyAnxiety, trauma, and depression or personality disorders become a fact of life for some people.

When negative thoughts and feelings prevent a person from accomplishing even the simplest daily activities, or start affecting relationships, it may be a good idea to consider having a talk with a reliable clinical psychologist.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is one option to consider. What is ACT?

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a type of psychotherapy that combines various strategies that focus on mindfulness and acceptance, enabling people to overcome negative behaviors and commit to the goal of making a change for the better. This therapeutic approach was developed in the late 1980s by health professionals Steven Hayes, Kelly Wilson and Kirk Strosahl.

When people are faced with a stressful situation that cannot be controlled, they can obsess over the event. These actions can keep them stuck in one place for quite some time, making them feel overwhelmed and helpless.

Instead of following this pattern, ACT encourages people to accept his reactions and be present, choose a valued direction, and take action.

ACT teaches effective strategies for thought management, specifically those that torment each person and negatively affect attitude and behavior. It also helps teach deal approaches for recognizing and acknowledging painful emotions without their taking control.

And finally, ACT teaches people techniques for maintaining focus on important things, as well as promoting value-driven action that can help people achieve greater purpose and a healthier, more enriched life.

ACT, like all psychotherapies, may not be for everyone. But if this sounds interesting to you, it may be something you want to check out next time you’re searching for a new therapist.