Best of Our Blogs

Some things we humans just love to avoid; others, we can’t seem to set free.

Maybe you’re anxious but not willing to deal with what’s stressing you out, or maybe your therapist gave you homework and you aren’t all that excited about doing it (or even understand why you should).

Maybe you just can’t seem to let go of anger for someone, but don’t understand how the grudge is affecting you, too.

Today’s Best of Our Blogs tackles some of these issues and more.

Treat Anxiety by Changing Your Brain
(Living a Balanced Life) — Gah, anxiety! We all deal with it at some point, don’t we? Of course, the more anxious we feel, the more stressed we feel – and vice versa. Dr. Michele Brennan explains that chronic stress can actually lead to changes in our brain waves, making it more difficult for us to calm down, and discusses three ways we can treat anxiety: relaxation techniques, biofeedback, and neurofeedback.

The Benefits of Homework in Therapy
(Lessons from the Couch) — Has your therapist ever sent you home with homework? Maybe you’re supposed to journal, work on certain skills, or create a schedule for yourself. Karisse Callender explains why this homework is an important part of treatment, including reasons such as empowerment, accountability, and engagement.

Limitation and Creativity
(Psychology & Pop Culture) — Sometimes, we creatives use certain limitations as “excuses” for creative-flow blocks, don’t we? We don’t have enough time, there’s not enough money, our tools aren’t good enough… Yet, those limitations don’t have to stymie inspiration. Dr. Brian Kong explains how they can actually benefit our creativity.

Grudges: Who Really Suffers?
(Relationships in Balance) — After explaining that grudge-holders can suffer just as much as those against whom they’re holding a grudge, Nathan Feiles asks, “Is it really worth it to hold a grudge?”

Shedding Light On a Dark Subject
(Building Relationship Skills) — Today is World Suicide Prevention Day, sponsored by the International Association for Suicide Prevention. Linda and Charlie Bloom explain that suicidal thoughts and feelings “are not a reflection of a moral deficiency or characterological weakness” and provide us with numerous suicide-related facts, including a list of suicide risk indicators.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 9 Sep 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Sparks, A. (2013). Best of Our Blogs: September 10, 2013. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 25, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2013/09/10/best-of-our-blogs-september-10-2013/

 

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