Best of Our Blogs

How do you know whether you’re making the right decision? How do any of us know whether what we’re doing is right?

The fear of landing on the right path or doing something the right way can become so paralyzing that we may feel incapable of making a decision. But those unanswered questions don’t just simply slip away. They haunt us sometimes years after a decision has already been made. Uncertainty is inevitable. There’s no real way of knowing whether returning to school was a right decision or postponing a trip was a good idea. We can’t know if having an illness, for example, will be precursor to a cursed life. Most of the time we can only guess, reaching around in the darkness for a light.

This is an ongoing issue for parents. An episode of Sex in the City does a good job of bringing light to parenting. Miranda tells her son’s father the following:

“Look, we’re both afraid we’re going to kill the baby, that’s a given, but we made an agreement this week – Monday to Friday I try not to kill him, Saturday and Sunday you try not to kill him.”

It puts a humorous spin on a topic many parents have to contend with on a daily basis. How do you know if what you’re doing or not doing is hazardous to your child’s physical or emotional health? Something as seemingly benign as signing them up for soccer, for example, could have potentially devastating consequences. And sometimes it’s what you may not do, express your expectations or be consistent that can beget future problems. It’s not about beating yourself up for your mistakes. As our posts this week will show, it’s all about self-forgiveness and the awareness that we’re all works-in-progress. It’s about second and third chances and trying again without the guilt.

Depression: More Creativity or Interrupting?
(The Creative Mind) – Is there an artistic upside to depression? It may be giving some a surprising creative advantage.

Athletes & Disordered Eating: What Parents Need To Know
(Weightless) – You might not equate sports with body image issues. But the pressure to perform could easily translate into potential problems with dieting or over exercising. This must-read for parents lists warning signs and tips to prevent kids from taking the path toward disordered eating.

5 Common Pitfalls of Parenting, and How to Avoid Them
(Sorting Out Your Life) – Children don’t come with their own how to manual. It’s inevitable that you’re going to make mistakes. Here are five tips for better (not perfect) parenting.

A Reinvented Meal: First Course – Relaxation
(360 of Mindful Living) – When is the best time to practice relaxation? Right before you eat. Find out why and get info on how to incorporate this mindful activity into your daily routine.

Don’t Touch Me There
(ADHD from A to Zoë) – If you have ADHD, being hypersensitive may come with the territory. As you’ll discover in this post, it’s all about putting a positive spin on the not so fun traits of being blessed with ADHD.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 3 Sep 2012
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Uyemura, B. (2012). Best of Our Blogs: September 4, 2012. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 25, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/09/04/best-of-our-blogs-september-4-2012/

 

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