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There are so many ways we can better ourselves. Formally, we can seek help through therapy, books, retreats and from the tutelage of teachers of workshops and graduate programs. But perhaps the best way to learn life’s greatest lessons is by confronting the things in our lives that we’re most afraid.

It’s something that occurred to me recently. That even after years of counseling courses, I have barely made a dent in the school of learning and that some of the biggest, most difficult challenges still await me.

Part of the reason why I bring this up is that Thanksgiving is next week. For some, the upcoming holiday is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to surround themselves with love, good food, good friends and family. But just because your life is far from the perfection of a greeting card, it doesn’t mean that it won’t be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for you too.

Sometimes forcing ourselves to confront what’s hard is good for us even if it doesn’t feel like it. Maybe this year it will be about carving out your own holiday or confronting a relative that’s been hurtful to you. It might even mean creating boundaries, taking time out to take care of yourself or revisit some of the painful past memories you’ve tried to runaway from. This is your chance to do it. I hope our posts this week will bring you the courage and motivation you need to get through it. And if you need an extra boost, check out our Coping with the Holidays Guide and our new e-book for help on managing family and the holidays. Happy Thanksgiving!

Grief, Anxiety, Self Awareness, Loss and ADHD: Emotional Soup

(ADHD Man of Distraction) – Kelly, unlike me, wasn’t surprised to learn that he had a long way to go in terms of his own journey towards healing. It seems that one of the by-products of having ADHD may make it harder to focus on fully experiencing grief. Yet, he’s up for the challenge. Read it and you may be inspired to confront your own difficulties.

Replacing Anxious Thoughts with Thanks

(Anxiety & OCD Exposed) – Psychologists aren’t immune to stress. Read how Dr. Laura Smith transformed Thanksgiving stress into one of gratitude and peace.

Eating Disorder Recovery: Laurie’s Story About The Power Of Faith

(Weightless) – In her interview with Christian counselor Laurie Glass, Margarita shows us how spirituality and eating disorder recovery can go hand in hand.

How Were You Diagnosed?

(Bipolar Beat) – There are a lot of factors involved in the process of being diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Read this to make sure you were given the full and proper treatment by the doctor and/or psychiatrist who diagnosed you.

Growing Inequality? Marriage Contributes to It

(Single at Heart) – An article touts marriage as the path leading to greater economic stability. Read why our newest blogger has a bone to pick with this writer and why she feels economic advantage isn’t just for those married.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 18 Nov 2011
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Uyemura, B. (2011). Best of the Blogs: November 18, 2011. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 23, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/11/18/best-of-the-blogs-november-18-2011/

 

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