Best of Our Blogs

Once I got to college, I began to love school. The feeling of working hard and then the instant gratification from all that hard work was awesome! One professor told me I’d be a professional student forever.

Of course in the real world, you can work as hard as you want and still feel like you haven’t quite made it. And it’s not just your career, but that gnawing, frustrating feeling could also apply to friendships and romantic relationships too.

I realized that the formulas that seem to work in school, working hard = A’s, just didn’t have a place in real life. Sometimes you could drive yourself crazy trying to force pieces of a puzzle that just didn’t go together.

In the whole process of going to school and finally getting out of it, I realized it was a lot easier to work on changing my attitude. Maybe it wasn’t that important to get the A. If I could see whatever situation I was in as the place I needed to be in that moment, instead of running from it or wishing it were different, then that acceptance would not only free me, but perhaps get me on the right path sooner.

I think it’s important to keep reminding yourself that you are where you are for a reason. The beginning of the journey to where you want to be is acceptance. I think this is the jewel of our posts this week. Whether it’s advocating acceptance through debunking hurtful and untrue myths on eating disorders or ending the perpetuation of self-defeating thoughts, there are words of wisdom for you here on how to better accept whatever situation you are in right now.

Happy 4th of July!

Myths About Binge Eating & The Challenges of Recovery

(Weightless) – Maybe it’s the “friend” that told you to just ”snap out of it” and that eating disorders are problems of the weak. This post will feel like the friend that you’ve always wanted. It provides the truth, challenges, and tips to overcome binge eating disorder.

The Most Classic Error When Trying to Fix Depression

(Mindfulness & Psychotherapy) – Why do we do it to ourselves? After climbing out of that hole of depression, we slide right back in. This may provide insight into why we might be doing it and offers a technique on how to prevent us from slipping once again.

4 Healthy Lifestyle and Healthy Heart Factors for Women

(Dialectical Behavior Therapy Understood) – There are a lot of things we can’t control in life. But here is something we can control-our lifestyle. These lifesaving tips could make all the difference. Why not start now?

The Warning Signs of Partner Suicide: Is the Path Warm?

(Partners in Wellness) – No one likes thinking about it, but paying attention to signs of suicide in your loved one could save their life. Here are some warning signs to look out for.

The Secret to Being Authentically You – Authenticity, Part I

(Neuroscience & Relationships) – Worrying about what others think about what you say and do can become crippling. The goal would be to feel safe, comfortable and free to be your authentic self. Easier said then done right? Here are a few things to help you get started.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 1 Jul 2011
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Uyemura, B. (2011). Best of Our Blogs: July 1, 2011. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 31, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/07/01/best-of-our-blogs-july-1-2011/

 

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