Finding Optimism: When Technology Meets Self-Help

Ever since I was discharged from the inpatient psychiatric program at Johns Hopkins, I have kept a mood journal where I daily record the amount of hours I sleep, my mood (rating it a fantastic and serene no. 1 to a frazzled, and I’m-headed-back-to-the-community-room no. 5), any foods that have triggered hyperactivity or irritability (such as a triple espresso and half of a chocolate-mousse pie), my anxiety level, any medication and vitamin/supplement changes, and a list of things I’m obsessing about: weight, job, friends, sisters, yada yada yada.

My journal looks like my house: messy … dangerously messy. I scribble something down and then Katherine gets a hold of the pad and draws a mermaid, or a big X through the object of obsession. In other words: it’s not a good system. Not at all. And it can’t really do the job of picking up patterns in order predict relapses. The information is too unorganized for that.

So ….

I decided to try the Optimism Software that my blogging buddy James Bishop has designed. Keep in mind that I am a technological moron, and had to ask him about 10 times how to download it. (If I can do it, you can definitely do it.) But after it was on my desktop and I could open it and start inputting my dysfunctional habits, I decided he was a genius.

Because it is much more than a software.

It’s a way of making you a more active part of your recovery.

For example, in that last month I’ve been using the software, I have become more disciplined about my sleep hygiene. I go to bed at 9:30 every night, and I get up at 5:30 in the morning. Knowing that I have to track my sleep in Optimism makes me less apt to act on the “This is brilliant! Let’s stay up all night!” thoughts that come in right as I’m about to shut down for the night.

Optimism screen shot

I’m also more aware of the contents that I put into my mouth. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that James’s software makes me eat better. (He would be very wealthy if this was the case.) But knowing that I have to record the items that tease my mood (pancakes with lots of maple syrup, double chocolate-chip cookies, mochas, fruit pops) make me more aware of the connection between the two (cookies and mood). And, I’m thinking that this awareness will eventually translate into more will power. At least that’s the plan.

The act of recording your diet, sleep, exercise, and stressors makes you more accountable. James writes:

Optimism prompts you to keep a detailed record of all things that affect your state of mind. By monitoring patterns in your life you can identify negative influences that you need to avoid, early warning signs that your health is deteriorating, and the inputs and activities that benefit you most. Simple charts highlight cause and effect relationships that you might normally miss, and you can develop a Health Plan to follow and update as you learn more about the things that positively and negatively affect you.

Go to FindingOptimism.com to find out more or to download a free trial.

I should also note that Optimism is now available in an online-version as well, and they are working on an iPhone version too for your mobile phone.

Optimism is “an action plan” for your mental health — it can be just the thing you might need to help keep you going toward your goals in therapy, life, or just changing behaviors or habits that are no longer working for you.

The best way to try out Optimism to see if it holds any value for you is to download the free 7-day trial and commit to using it during those 7 days. You may be surprised that such a simple idea can translate into such a big deal in your life!

-Dr. John Grohol

 


Comments


View Comments / Leave a Comment

This post currently has 6 comments.
You can read the comments or leave your own thoughts.


    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 25 Oct 2009
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Borchard, T. (2009). Optimism: Great Technology That Can Help You. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 24, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2009/10/25/optimism-software-technology-meets-self-help/

 

Recent Comments
  • Gaetane: Thank you. I needed to read this today :-)
  • Vencislav Popov: Correction – they actually tested for the effect with a regression based on percentage of...
  • Vencislav Popov: Chris, You raise some valid points about the degree of manipulaiton and whether people actually...
  • Martin: I have a friend whose life has difficulties due to psychological problems. Part of this is a belief in...
  • Nini: Congratulations ! You really did it !
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 9934
Join Us Now!