Psychologists can be an odd bunch.

Some of their expertise comes in the understanding of complex psychological tests. Older tests used are called “projective” tests and while a few are still in use amongst the more psychodynamically-minded psychologists, most are not. Instead, most psychologists rely on more objective tests, such as the MMPI-2 or an IQ test such as the WAIS-IV. Objective tests also must be interpreted, but with computer programs doing most of the heavy work nowadays, there’s not as much subjectivity left in a common psychological assessment.

When I was in school 15+ years ago, the Rorschach Inkblot Test was still taught (under the Exner system). You know, that’s the funny little test cloaked in secrecy that you say what comes to mind when you look at each one of ten cards with, well, inkblots on them.

I say “secrecy” because the theory is that if someone sees the inkblots before they take the test, it somehow will influence or impact the test. I say “theory” because there’s no actual empirical evidence to show this is true with the Rorschach. It’s just a theory. So the inkblot cards have typically been cloaked in secrecy, as though the cards themselves held some sort of deep magic into one’s innermost thoughts and psyche.

Well, no longer. If you’ve ever been interested in seeing what all the secrecy was about all those years (prepared to be severely disappointed), they are readily now available online, courtesy of Wikipedia:

Rorschach inkblot test

The test can provide some insight into a person, but its reliability and validity has been rightfully questioned. The results can vary widely based upon who administers and interprets the test. And while still administered from time to time, psychologists tend to give any results found from it the lowest priority.

Few people will ever have the opportunity to take this test nowadays, so I suspect the chances of this “ruining” your results to be extremely slim to none. Enjoy.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 26 Sep 2008
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Grohol, J. (2008). Rorschach Inkblot Cards. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2008/09/26/rorschach-inkblot-cards/

 

 

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