Despite the hysteria a year ago about a one-year spike in teenage suicide rates, new data show what many were previously cautioning about — drawing broad conclusions from a single datapoint:

The new research, based on 1996-2005 national data, appears in Wednesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association. It shows the rate dropped by about 5 percent [...] from 1,983 suicides in 2004 to 1,883 in 2005.

You’d think everyone would be happy with such a drop, but no, people commenting on the study in the article continue to express caution, despite the decline.

Also not surprising is the lack of anyone drawing any type of causal relationships in the article tied to the suicide rate decline. When things go badly, everyone looks to point fingers at a cause. When things go well, everyone just assumes that whatever we’re doing must be working.

Well, we’re happy and we’re not particularly worried. We’re happy that fewer teens died that year due to a self-inflicted and senseless death. And we’re happy that nobody is making broad statements about causality of this decline which are not supported by the data.

Read the full article: Teen suicides dip, experts worry rate remains high

 


Comments


View Comments / Leave a Comment

This post currently has 5 comments.
You can read the comments or leave your own thoughts.


    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 3 Sep 2008
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Grohol, J. (2008). Teen Suicide Rates Decline. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 28, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2008/09/03/teen-suicide-rates-decline/

 

Recent Comments
  • mary: I really did not find anything helpful here. I am a very sensitive person, yet I eat, well, sleep, and...
  • Therese Borchard: Thanks, very much, for your great comments! Therese
  • Kim: I think you hit the nail on the head.
  • Hank Roberts: For anyone dealing with winter depression — it’s time to start using your dawn simulator...
  • Amelia: Very true. It’s easy to forget to take time for ourselves; to say we don’t have time, that...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code