New research from the University of Toronto found that creativity is improved when people are in a good mood. Essentially, experiencing positive emotions allows a person to see the world differently, unlocking some potential to interpret it and contribute in a novel way. Unfortunately, some of this change in attention can also lead to increased distractability.

“If you are doing something that requires you be creative or be in a think tank, you want to be in a place with good mood,” said Anderson. “For example, if you are having difficulty solving a problem, a typical reaction is to get angry. But that can actually make it harder to solve the problem. One prescription is to go out and play to get yourself in a good mood, and then come back to the problem.”

I think that is fantastic advice, but may be easier said that done. Our history of approaches to difficult problems can interfere with the ability to bring up positive emotions when they are needed. Hopefully, even simple understanding of this phenomenon can help some people get into a better mindset when it is needed.

 


Comments


View Comments / Leave a Comment

This post currently has 2 comments.
You can read the comments or leave your own thoughts.


    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Dec 2006
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Meek, W. (2006). Positive Emotions & Creativity. Psych Central. Retrieved on January 27, 2015, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2006/12/21/positive-emotions-creativity/

 

Recent Comments
  • Piniewski MD: Well said. Regardless of our positions on this topic, the behavior :using Dr Google is unlikely to...
  • Starfate: I’m 61 and trying to determine the “best” way to tell my AS spouse that I’m leaving...
  • Theresa: Well I think that is a real shame. Not all therapists are so incongruent. In fact humanistic person-centred...
  • Daisy: I too am feeling the loss of a best friend. She told me that I had been treating her like s*it for the last...
  • Joyous: Gonoodle.com has short brain breaks for classroom teachers to use. I use them everyday- it really helps!
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 6119
Join Us Now!