Sad events often lead to news organizations to lose their sense of reality (and of compassion), by making ridiculous claims, as the UK’s The Times does here:

Gill’s blog on the “Goth” website vampirefreaks.com provided a chilling insight into his obsession with guns and death.

Does it now? Or does it provide just another link to journal and profile entries that look like thousands of other websites??

Indeed, nothing the alleged murderer, Kimveer Gill, 25, wrote on his website offers any more insight into his behavior than it would on anyone else’s. Randomly killing innocent students at a school will no make no more, nor no less, sense with or without a journal or myspace-equivalent profile.

An emotional outburt expressed via bullets and gunfire has no rational explanation. While it’s natural human behavior to try and make sense of such irrational acts — even by looking at the individual’s words online — you won’t find any answers there.

You will, instead, find the pain and expression similar to that of thousands of others seeking to understand who they are and where they fit in in this world.

There is no greater tragedy than news organizations making it sound as if this person’s life was more insightful and meaningful than it was. Or that everything could’ve been prevented if someone had just noticed it.

 


Comments


View Comments / Leave a Comment

This post currently has 0 comments.
You can read the comments or leave your own thoughts.


    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 14 Sep 2006
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Grohol, J. (2006). Turning Tragedy Into News. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 27, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2006/09/14/turning-tragedy-into-news/