Bipolar World, an excellent resource covering just about every aspect of the illness, offers some sage advice for family members of a person who refuses treatment. At times an individual may not believe him/herself to be ill – one of the hallmarks of psychosis and mania.

The article is relevant to anyone with a family member suffering mental illness, not just bipolar disorder. The key is that unless the person is a danger to him/herself or others (and therefore subject to being committed/certified to a hospital for involuntary care) treatment cannot be forced, and what is most helpful is protecting and educating yourself. Many mental health organizations offer support for family members – try the Depression and Bipolar Supprt Alliance or the Canadian Mental Health Association for free, confidential assistance.

 


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    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 25 Feb 2006
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.

APA Reference
Kiume, S. (2006). Helping Someone Who Doesn’t Want Help. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2006/02/23/helping-someone-who-doesnt-want-help/

 

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