I can’t help lying, my brain is deformed!

Brain abnormalities linked to pathological lying

Pathological liars may have structural abnormalities in their brains, a new study suggests.

Dr. Adrian Raine and Yaling Yang of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and colleagues found that individuals who habitually lied and cheated had less gray matter and more white matter in their prefrontal cortex than normal people. They report their findings in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Past studies have found that the prefrontal cortex shows heightened activity when normal people lie, and it is...
Continue Reading

Free American broadband!

Free American broadband!

Next time you sit down to pay your cable-modem or DSL bill, consider this: Most Japanese consumers can get an Internet connection that's 16 times faster than the typical American DSL line for a mere $22 per month.

Across the globe, it's the same story. In France, DSL service that is 10 times faster than the typical United States connection; 100 TV channels and unlimited telephone service cost only $38 per month. In South Korea, super-fast connections are common for less...
Continue Reading

Cyber-Catharsis: Bloggers Use Web Sites as Therapy

Cyber-Catharsis: Bloggers Use Web Sites as Therapy

The Internet is now teeming with some 15 million blogs. Although the medium first drew mainstream attention with commentary on high-profile events such as the presidential election, many now use it to chronicle intensely personal experiences, venting confessions in front of millions of strangers who can write back.

Nearly half of bloggers consider it a form of therapy, according to a recent survey sponsored by America Online Inc. And although some psychologists question the use of the Internet...
Continue Reading

Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment seem to work best together

Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment seem to work best together

Most clinical studies examine individuals either during or immediately following treatment. A study in the October issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research tracks individuals for 16 years who have first acknowledged their alcohol-use problems and then chosen Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), treatment, or both. Findings indicate that people who become involved in both AA and treatment fare better than those who obtain only treatment.

"We know that self-help groups, such as AA, contribute to better alcohol-related...
Continue Reading

Schizophrenia: early treatment improves outcome

Schizophrenia: early treatment improves outcome

For many years, psychiatrists have argued over whether or not early intervention after a schizophrenia patient's first episode of psychosis could improve the patient's long-term outcome. A new study concludes that early intervention can improve outcome.

Historically, the prevailing view has been that "it just doesn't matter when you treat a person because their clinical outcome is predetermined," Dr. Diana O. Perkins from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explained in a UNC statement.

This view, which holds that...
Continue Reading

Blood Test for Anxiety? Does this help anyone?

Slashdot is all abuzz about an article submission where a bunch of researchers from Hebrew University in Israel are claiming they have created a simple blood test that can test for "anxiety" within a few hours. I read the article twice and am amazed by a few simple observations:

1. Typically professionals read something like this and look for a journal reference, showing that the researchers took the time to scientifically validate their work. Perhaps it was just shoddy reporting of the "IsraCast" website...
Continue Reading

1st Female Sexual Medicine Conference

Palm Spring, CA.
March 2-4, 2006.

This meeting will cover the most recent information, updates, clinical trials, and present-day therapies for Female Sexual Medicine, including presentations on:

Female Sexual Function
Female Sexual Dysfunction
Female Sexual Arousal Disorder
Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder
Nerve-sparing hysterectomy and gynecological procedures
Clitoral Creams and...
Continue Reading

Smarter on Drugs

Smarter on Drugs:
We recoil at the idea of people taking drugs to enhance their intelligence. But why?

In a thought-provoking essay by Michael Gazzaniga, the October issue of Scientific American explores the use of drugs for "normal" people to enhance their intelligence.


Any child can tell you that some people are smarter than others. But what is the difference between the brain of a student and the brain of the average Joe? If we can figure that out, then a bigger question follows:...
Continue Reading

Passwords add up to information overload for brain

Passwords add up to information overload for brain

Remembering passwords has become such a problem for people trying to live in the modern information age, that for years there has been a thriving industry of password management programs available.

Security experts tend to agree that rather than using easy-to-remember (or 'weak' passwords) or any words that can be found in a dictionary, use a combination of nonsense words and numbers, and throw in a symbol for good luck. Need help remember it? Believe it...
Continue Reading