Caffeine withdrawal may be recognized as a disorder

Caffeine withdrawal may be recognized as a disorder
If you missed your morning coffee and now you have a headache and difficulty concentrating, you might be able to blame it on caffeine withdrawal. In general, the more caffeine consumed, the more severe withdrawal symptoms are likely to be, but as little as one standard cup of coffee a day can produce caffeine addiction, according to a Johns Hopkins study that reviewed over 170 years of caffeine withdrawal...
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Men, Women More Different Than Thought

Men, Women More Different Than Thought
Beyond the tired cliches and sperm-and-egg basics taught in grade school science class, researchers are discovering that men and women are even more different than anyone realized.

It turns out that major illnesses like heart disease and lung cancer are influenced by gender and that perhaps treatments for women ought to be slightly different from the approach used for men.

These discoveries are part of a quiet but revolutionary change infiltrating medicine as a growing number of scientists realize...
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Talk Therapy Beats Drugs for Insomnia

Talk Therapy Beats Drugs for Insomnia
Boston researchers have found that cognitive behavioral therapy is more effective than sleeping pills in treating chronic sleep-onset insomnia.

In a study summarized in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School found non-drug techniques yield better short- and long-term results than the most widely prescribed sleeping pill, zolpidem, commonly known as...
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Two views on suicide risk with antidepressants

Two views on suicide risk with antidepressants

The recent FDA proposal to force antidepressants to carry warnings about increased suicide risk is the subject of a pair of articles by leading experts in The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. According to "Antidepressants, Suicide, and the FDA: A Loose Association," the FDA proposal is premature and may be counterproductive. The companion piece "Antidepressants: an Avoidable and Solvable Controversy" cautions the warnings simply don't address the fundamental problem. Both articles are posted at The Annals of Pharmacotherapy's Articles...
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Wealth does not create individual happiness and it doesn’t build a strong country, either

Wealth does not create individual happiness and it doesn't build a strong country, either

A study in the recent issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest addresses how economic status is no longer a sufficient gauge of a nation's well-being. The authors argue that the psychological well-being of its citizens is the greatest measure of a nation-- not the well-being of its economy. "While wealth has trebled over the past 50 years%u2026well-being has been flat, mental illness has increased at an even more...
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Children of Teen Mothers Have Raised Suicide Risk

Children of Teen Mothers Have Raised Suicide Risk

Babies of teenage mothers and infants who have a low birth weight have a higher risk of committing suicide later in life than other children, Swedish scientists said Friday. In a study of more than 700,000 young adults, researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm found that infants born to young mothers or those who weighed pounds at birth were twice as likely to try to kill...
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Ins and Outs of Teledildonics

Ins and Outs of Teledildonics

Cybersex gets blamed for a lot of things, including social isolation, infidelity and divorce. It's a temptation previous generations of lovers didn't have to face, and it's technology, and therefore it's scary for a lot of folks.

Yet remote interaction technology -- or, as I like to call it, teledildonics -- has as much potential to bring people together as it does to drive people apart. If you travel often, or if you're in a long-distance relationship, this technology...
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Knowing When to Call it Quits in Psychotherapy

Knowing When to Call it Quits in Psychotherapy

As often as people ask a question about how to begin therapy, folks don't seem to ask how they will know it's time to call it quits. Psychotherapy involves a relationship between two people and ending any social or professional relationship can be difficult. Therapists are trained to know how to successfully end a therapeutic relationship in a healthy, positive manner. Despite their training, however, sometimes the therapist doesn't know exactly when to end therapy. This...
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Simple telephone call found to help on depression

Simple telephone call found to help on depression
Today's treatments for depression can leave a lot to be desired, but new pills or modes of therapy are not necessarily the answer. Rather, simple changes in how existing treatments are delivered can yield significant improvements.

A new study, published earlier this month in an issue of the British Medical Journal, found that inexpensive enhancements to care by primary care physicians, such as followup phone calls to patients, could boost response to treatment by almost 30...
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Study Reveals Why Eyes In Some Paintings Seem To Follow Viewers

Study Reveals Why Eyes In Some Paintings Seem To Follow Viewers

You've seen it in horror movies, or even in real-life at the local museum: a painting in which the eyes of the person portrayed seem to follow you around the room, no matter where you go. People have described the effect as creepy or eerie, and some have thought it supernatural. But now researchers have demonstrated the very natural cause for this visual...
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