PTSD May Raise Physical Woes in Women

For many women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), declines in mental and physical health too often go hand-in-hand, researchers report.

"Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with a greater burden of medical illness than is seen in depression alone," write the authors of a study in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal...
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In young women, depression can mean literal heartbreak

Young women with a history of depression are twice as likely to have the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms that raise the risk of heart disease, according to a new study.

Men with a similar history do not suffer as frequently from the same symptoms, writes Leslie S. Kinder, , of the Veterans' Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

"Perhaps the health risks linked to depression are more critical to women," Kinder...
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Most Americans List Lack of Insurance Coverage & Cost as Top Reasons For Not Seeking Mental Health Services

Most Americans List Lack of Insurance Coverage & Cost as Top Reasons For Not Seeking Mental Health Services
Insurance coverage problems and costs supplant stigma as the number one obstacle to accessing mental health services according to a survey commissioned by the American Psychological Association.

Americans say it’s lack of insurance coverage (87%) or cost (81%) that most keeps them from seeing a mental health professional with 65% citing lack of insurance coverage as a very important reason for not seeking treatment.

Survey results...
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Paxil Said Ineffective for Depressed Kids

GlaxoSmithKline PLC, which is being sued for allegedly concealing negative information on the effects of its Paxil anti-depressant on children, admitted this week that the drug didn't show a benefit over a sugar pill when treating depression in children.

Better late than never I The full list of studies, called for by the medical journal The Lancet is also available from the Glaxo Web site. The Lancet has been an outspoken critic of Glaxo throughout this...
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Sex Therapy On Call (and Online!)

"For Michael and others who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues face-to-face, distance sex therapy, as it's known, is providing a new option. Its practitioners include credentialed sex therapists who counsel clients by phone, e-mail or in Internet chat rooms, where they address deeply personal issues without ever meeting. In doing so, they've set off a debate about the ethics, legality and effectiveness of such practice."

The article goes on to note an important finding about e-therapy:

"Stephen Biggs, a PhD candidate in clinical psychology, surveyed...
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More Faculty ‘Kick the Lecture Habit’ in Favor of Case Studies Method

Want to make college science faculty really nervous? Tell them to stop lecturing and start telling stories, instead.

That's the advice that science faculty hear when they participate in one of the "Case Studies in Science" workshops at the University at Buffalo, directed by Clyde (Kipp) Herreid, , SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. "It's quite a challenge and some of the professors get very nervous," admits Herreid....
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New bills fill prescription for a turf war

Across the country, psychiatrists and psychologists are engaged in a bruising battle. Two professions normally focused on respecting emotions and listening are instead hurling barbs, accusing each other of caring more about money and turf than patients.

The issue: giving psychologists the authority to prescribe drugs.

I usually side on psychiatrists on this one. If you look at the history of this issue (which dates back to the late 1980's, it's as much about a turf war as it is about providing patients with the...
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