Psych Central

Mother with Schizophrenia

By Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Hello, my mom has had Schizophrenia since I was born. Having seeing her before her medication has definitely scarred me but that’s not the problem. Even on her medication she still talks to herself, every time I hear it, I hear a little too much and it hurts my feelings pretty bad. She has tried to divorce my dad twice but we expected it was because of her schizophrenia because she ended up coming back both times. So every day I have no idea what would happen next, sometimes I get paranoid that she might do something really bad. When I hear her talking to herself I usually hear her talking crap about some family member but she always tells me that she loves me and everyone else. I really don’t know what to do to feel more comfortable with my mom around the house.

A. I am very sorry that you are faced with this challenging situation. I would encourage you to speak to your father. Make him aware of your fears about your mother. He may also be unaware of the fact that your mother continues to have symptoms despite being on medication. This is a sign that she may need her medication adjusted. It may also mean that she is not taking her medication.

Is there an adult family member or family friend with whom you can stay? Moving may not be an option but ideally it would be best for you to be removed from the chaotic home environment. Having a strong, supportive person in your life is important. It helps you to feel safe and protected in your home. It is difficult to relax in an unpredictable living environment.

If you believe that your mother is a threat to herself or to others, then it is imperative to call the authorities or the local mental health crisis team. I fully understand and appreciate how difficult making that call might be but safety is paramount. If she is a danger to herself or to others, the hospital can protect her. It may not be the ideal option but it is the most effective option.

Finally, you and your father should consider contacting the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). NAMI has support groups for individuals who have family members with mental illnesses. They have support groups in virtually every city across the country. NAMI support group members are dealing with issues that are very similar to yours. Having that support may assist your family in dealing with this situation. Please don’t hesitate to write again if you have additional questions or concerns.


Dr. Kristina Randle

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 25 May 2012

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2012). Mother with Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 17, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2012/05/25/mother-with-schizophrenia/