Not Sure What’s Wrong

By Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Well first I suffered from depression from ages 13-16. I am now 19 and haven’t had any suicidal thoughts, or any unusual behavior like I did before. My boyfriend has brought a few things to my attention and he thinks I need help. I personally didn’t think so for a long time until recently when I actually paid attention. I have extremely frequent mood swings, when I get upset, depressed, anxious, excited, or any type of emotion I tend to bite the side of my mouth, sometimes until it hurts or starts to bleed. When I am driving sometimes I don’t realize I am pressing on the gas too hard and going very fast, this usually happens when I am upset and thinking of the particular situation which has gotten me upset. I recently started biting down on my teeth at night while sleeping and when I awake in the morning I can still feel the pressure. I get extremely hyper sometime for no apparent reason. I do things without thinking, and forget things within a short amount of time. Its hard for me to concentrate in school if it is not interesting. I am depressed 40% of my day if it is a good one, a bad one is increasingly worse. I tend to not care about important things. And when I am upset I get out of control, throw things, and sometimes get abusive. I don’t know what it is. Can someone give me some ideas?

A. I cannot provide a diagnosis on the basis of a short letter but some possibilities may include depression or bipolar disorder. Keep in mind that only an in-person, psychological evaluation can determine if you have a mental health diagnosis.

I would agree with your boyfriend who believes that you could benefit from professional help. Your symptoms are concerning. It is not normal to be moody, anxious, and so forth. Your symptoms are a sign that something is wrong. They should be addressed and not minimized. The sooner that you can receive treatment, the sooner your symptoms will decrease or possibly be eliminated.

Receiving treatment is nothing to be frightened of. Mental health professionals are trained to deal with the exact symptoms that you have described. A mental health professional may suggest medication or psychotherapy to treat your symptoms. Until you have received a full evaluation, it is difficult to know what treatment would be the most effective.

The most responsible and wisest decision that you could make, at this point, is to have a thorough psychological evaluation with a mental health professional. Please take care.

Dr. Kristina Randle

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 8 Jan 2012

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2012). Not Sure What’s Wrong. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 22, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2012/01/08/not-sure-whats-wrong-2/